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Sat, 15 Aug 2020
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Quake hits Iranian oil-rich area, minor damage

TEHRAN - A 5.1 magnitude earthquake jolted Iran's oil-rich southwest on Tuesday and caused minor damage to buildings, the official IRNA news agency said.

The quake occurred at 12:20 a.m. EST near the town of Ghaleh-tal in an eastern part of Khuzestan province and the tremor was felt in the provincial capital Ahvaz and elsewhere, IRNA reported.

Evil Rays

Two earthquakes felt across Israel

Geophysical Institute reports two quakes, measuring 3 and 4.5 on Richter scale and originating in northern Dead Sea, shook country Tuesday morning. Ynet readers report feeling earth moved in J'lem, Tel Aviv, Haifa and south.

Two earthquakes, measuring 3 and 4.5 on the Richter scale, were felt across Israel on Tuesday morning. The Geophysical Institute of Israel (GII ) reported that the quakes shook the entire country and originated in the northern Dead Sea.

According to the Magen David Adom rescue services, there were no reports of injuries or damage.

Bizarro Earth

A World Dying, but Can We Unite to Save It?

Humanity is rapidly turning the seas acid through the same pollution that causes global warming, the world's governments and top scientists agreed yesterday. The process - thought to be the most profound change in the chemistry of the oceans for 20 million years - is expected both to disrupt the entire web of life of the oceans and to make climate change worse.

Ambulance

The mystery of dead dolphins in Persian Gulf

An autopsy has been carried out on one of the 73 dead dolphin bodies found on Jask beaches, south of Iran, ISNA reported on October 29, 2007.

Better Earth

Shake, rattle and roll: 5.8 Earthquake strikes off Oregon coast

A 5.8 magnitude earthquake struck at 11:52 a.m. today off the west coast of Oregon, about 150 miles due west of Bandon.

©USGS

Bizarro Earth

Survivors Tell of Bangladesh Cyclone

Azahar Ali huddled with his family, reading from the Quran, as the cyclone roared in. First the power went out, then screaming winds blew out the windows and ripped off the roof. The sea rushed in, washing him and his family away.

The 80-year-old awoke in a rice paddy to find his son, daughter-in- law, three grandchildren and three other relatives dead, among the more than 3,100 people killed by Cyclone Sidr.

Bizarro Earth

Worst Forest Disaster in U.S. History

Hurricane Katrina Destroyed Millions of Trees, Increasing Climate Change

When Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast two years ago, the storm devastated 320 million trees.

Now the United States is suffering the worst forest catastrophe in its history, according to a new analysis by the journal Science.

Better Earth

World's Hottest Chili to Repel Elephants

Wildlife experts in northeastern India are experimenting with a new weapon to prevent marauding elephants from destroying homes and crops and trampling people in villages close to their habitat - super-hot chilies.

Conservationists working on the experimental project in Assam state said they have put up jute fences smeared with automobile grease and bhut jolokia - also known as the ghost chili and certified as the world's hottest chili by the Guinness Book of World Records. They also were using smoke bombs made from the chili to keep elephants out.

Attention

Bangladesh storm toll could exceed 10,000 - Red Crescent

Super cyclone Sidr could have claimed the lives of more than 10,000 people in Bangladesh, or several times more than official statistics, the country's Red Crescent Society said on Monday.

The category four cyclone, the most powerful in the South Asian country in the past decade, hit the coast of Bangladesh late on Thursday, with winds reaching 240 km (150 miles) per hour, ripping up trees and leveling houses, as well as causing damage to crops, transport routes, communication and power supply lines. Many coastal districts were flooded.

Bizarro Earth

Israel: The big earthquake is due

Most Israelis can remember a day when their furniture started to shake, and can also take credit for surviving that day with little difficulty. But very few people are in a position to know firsthand the effects of a truly disastrous earthquake, on a magnitude of seven or higher on the Richter scale, as the last recorded such earthquake in Israel occurred in 1033.

And that's the problem: Geology experts agree that Israel is long overdue for the next "Big One," and it can happen at any time. This poses a significant threat to population centers in the country, since many buildings in Israel were erected prior to the formulation of earthquake-resistant construction codes. There is also substantial doubt that the codes are being strictly enforced. With the barrage of immediate threats competing for Israelis' attention - whether terrorism, car accidents, global warming or secondhand smoke - a major earthquake may seem like an improbable, even paranoid fear.