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Mon, 25 May 2020
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Signs and Portents: Oregon family surprised by birth of two-faced kitten

An Oregon family was surprised when they discovered their cat’s litter included a special kitten with two heads.
© BJ King
An Oregon family was surprised when they discovered their cat’s litter included a special kitten with two heads.
While checking on her pregnant cat, an Oregon woman was surprised to find she'd already given birth, and one of the kittens had two faces.

On Wednesday morning, Kyla King was checking on her expectant cat on her farm east of Albany when she noticed four kittens had already been born. One hiding behind its mom, Portland station KOIN-TV reports, had two heads.

"I came back out and looked again," she told the Albany Democrat-Herald, "and I was like, 'Ah!'"


Snowflake

Significant snowfall overnight at Okanagan Connector, British Columbia

Winter is still hanging on at the higher elevations Friday.
© DriveBC
Winter is still hanging on at the higher elevations Friday.
While warm weather and longer days in the Valley are sure signs summer is on the way, winter is hanging on at higher elevations.

Those driving the Okanagan Connector Friday morning will find significant snow on the highway, and it continues to fall. About nine centimetres of snow fell on the Pennask Summit through the night, while the Coquihalla saw a light dusting of snow that has since been melted by rain.

Webcams on the Connector shows the snow has also fallen on the Elkhart area, but the lower-elevation Brenda Mine region remains clear.

And while warm conditions have been rapidly melting snow at Big White, getting the mountain ready for its June 26 kick off to the mountain bike season, snow also fell at the resort overnight.

Cow

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Food price gouging, global hunger riots and real estate collapse

rapid food inflation
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)
The final blow to the way of life you and I know will be the new 50 days on 30 days off lock down strategy being implemented globally beginning this summer. Meat, chicken and poultry packers will not be able to open at even a fraction of former throughput. Chile gives us a glimpse of where that will lead. Real Estate market crashes as BOA unloads 10+ million shares of a real estate ETF. Put on the shoulder straps, and buckle up.


Comment: Food riots break out in Santiago, Chile, as government extends lockdown for third month and makes it even STRICTER


Snowflake Cold

North America has set 233 new all-time monthly low temperature records in May (so far) vs just the 18 record highs

Maunder-Minimum-painting


The majority of North America has suffered an historically chilly start to 2020, and the cold isn't letting up, continuing through May and busting hundreds of low temperature records as it goes.


The month of May has been a chilly one thus far at Reagan National Airport, located in Virginia on the border with D.C., with the station experiencing its third coldest start to May since records began back in 1966.

According to local news site wjla.com, the area has, through the 19th, seen 14 days below average, one day at average, and only four days above average.

"Our average high for the first 18 days of the month was just 68.8 degrees, with an average low of 50.4," reads the wjla.com article. "Together, that puts us at an average monthly temperature of 59.6 degrees, which is 4.4 degrees below normal."

Comment: See also: Also check out SOTT radio's:


Cloud Precipitation

At least 8 dead after more floods in Kasese, Uganda

Floods in Kasese, Uganda, 21 May 2020.
© Uganda Red Cross
Floods in Kasese, Uganda, 21 May 2020.
At least 8 people have died in flash floods in the Western Region of Uganda.

Torrential rain on 21 May caused several rivers to overflow in Kasese district, in particular the Lhubiriha river.

Several people were swept away in the floods. Around 4 people survived and were taken to hospital. Uganda Red Cross said that 8 fatalities have been confirmed.

Homes have been damaged and hundreds of people displaced. A bridge that connects Uganda to the Democratic Republic of Congo was destroyed.


Seismograph

6.1 earthquake hits off west coast of Mexico

Quake off Mexico
The U.S. Geological Survey says a relatively strong earthquake has been recorded in the Pacific Ocean west of Mexico.

The quake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.1, hit at 3:46 a.m. local time Friday at a shallow depth of 10 kilometers (6 miles). The epicenter was 173 km (108 miles) east southeast of the resort city of San Jose del Cabo, on the southern tip of the Baja California peninsula.

No tsunami warning was issued.

Cloud Precipitation

Major hail storm pounds San Angelo, Texas

2020 Major Hail in San Angelo May 21, 2020.
© Brent Blinka
2020 Major Hail in San Angelo May 21, 2020.
A major hail storm blew up over San Angelo Thursday evening pounding vehicles and houses across the city.

There are pictures of hail the size of tennis balls.

Damage reports are still coming in.

Watch video from the storm.


Comment: The following evening further north in Burkburnett:




Attention

Study finds microplastics in Florida birds of prey for 1st time

Ospreys, like the one pictured here, are among the types of birds of prey in Florida that have been found to be accumulating microplastics in their stomachs.
© Linda Walters/ University of Central Florida.
Ospreys, like the one pictured here, are among the types of birds of prey in Florida that have been found to be accumulating microplastics in their stomachs.
A new study has confirmed the presence of microplastics in birds of prey, including hawks, ospreys and owls. The accumulation of microplastics in birds' digestive systems could lead to poisoning, starvation and death.

A new study has found, for the first time, the presence of microplastics in the digestive systems of terrestrial and aquatic birds of prey in Florida, including hawks, ospreys and owls.

Microplastics are not a specific kind of plastic, but rather any type of plastic fragment that is less than 5 mm in length - less than the size of a pencil tip. They enter natural ecosystems from a variety of sources, including cosmetics, synthetic clothing, and industrial processes.

The accumulation of microplastics in birds' digestive systems could lead to poisoning, starvation and death, according to the study, which was published online in the journal Environmental Pollution. University of Central Florida biologist Julia Carlin is the study's lead author, said that birds of prey are critical to a functioning ecosystem:

Snowflake

Rare May snow hits Pakistan's Ayubia for the first time in 100 years

Rare Ayubia snow
© SCREENGRAB
Snowfall on Tuesday was very unusual even for the local population, most of whom had never seen such weather in May.
Famous for its lush green mountains, Ayubia received mild snowfall in the month of May, which has happened after a 100-year hiatus in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa's Abbottabad district.

Nearby areas including the Galiyat region also received light snowfall on Tuesday which was very unusual even for the local population.

Haji Muhammad Aniyat Abbasi, a 90-year-old resident of Ayubia, told The Express Tribune that he hasn't seen such weather since the British colonial rule before the partition.

Abbasi said his elder brother told him that in 1920s the beautiful hilly region had received snowfall last time in the month of May.

He said when his forefathers resided in the region, the cold weather used to be very harsh even in June and they used to face many hardships.


Comment: Earlier this month heavy snowfall in Galyat, Pakistan broke a 35-year record with over 12 feet in 20 days.


Attention

Subsidizing the slaughter: Big wind kills another Bald Eagle, gets more federal subsidies

A bald eagle flies over Mill Pond in Centerport, New York in 2018.
© Bruce Bennett/Getty
A bald eagle flies over Mill Pond in Centerport, New York in 2018.
On May 1, the Toledo Blade reported that a wind turbine in Bowling Green, Ohio had killed an adult bald eagle. Six days later, the Treasury Department announced that it would provide another extension of the production tax credit, the lucrative subsidy that the wind industry has relied on for decades.

The death of the eagle provides a stark reminder of the deadly toll that the wind industry is having on some of America's most iconic wildlife and how that toll will skyrocket if the many proponents of an all-renewable-energy system get their wish. And the extension of the PTC provides a stark reminder of how an influential industry can manipulate the Washington favor factory and in doing so, turn what were supposed to be temporary subsidies into permanent ones worth billions of dollars per year - and even more remarkably, get those subsidies extended without ever getting the money appropriated by Congress.

The eagle was killed at the Wood County Landfill in January. Matt Markey of the Toledo Blade broke the story. Markey reports that two employees of the landfill heard the turbine hit the eagle. Upon hearing the noise, they turned to "witness a large bird tumbling to the frozen ground. What they soon learned was the severed wing of the bird floated in its slower descent and landed about 50 feet away." The employees reported the eagle death to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, which collected the animal and contacted the US Fish and Wildlife Service. (The four-turbine wind project responsible for the bald eagle's death is 50-percent owned by the city of Bowling Green. The project provides 1.5 percent of the city's electricity.)