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Fri, 24 Sep 2021
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Gold Bar

The Great Keynesian Coup of August 1971: Fifty years later

Gold Cert./Nixon
© Public Domain/Getty Images/National Archive/KJN
Gold Certificate • Former US President Richard Nixon
On August 15, 1971, the last remains of what had been a magnificent monetary system died a terrible death, and the American academic, political, business, and media elites led the cheers. The Dow Jones Average jumped by more than 32 points the next day. A de facto national default was spun as a great liberation from a tyrannical financial arrangement that had plagued humanity for generations. A half century later the disinformation continues, as intellectual bankruptcy parallels the financial bankruptcy of that event.

I write, of course, of the decision by President Richard Nixon to officially close the "gold window," through which the US government was obligated to sell its gold stores to foreign governments at $35 an ounce, which even then was a bargain. As Nixon's regime encouraged the Federal Reserve System to inflate the dollar to pay for its bloated military and welfare spending, as had the Johnson and Kennedy regimes before him, it became apparent that the US dollar was quickly losing value. The United States was in rapid decline — and the dollar was falling with the nation's prestige.

Blue Planet

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Downfall of civilization triggers

Histomap
© YouTube/Adapt 2030 (screen capture)
The Histomap of the last 4000 years of world history published in 1931 shows all of the major Grand Solar Minimums with contractions of empires and kingdoms through history. Its simple, inadequate food supplies equal civilization crumbling. There are several unnamed GSM's in the 4000 years as well. 2024 brings the next global contraction in food supplies.


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Star of David

The dark roots of 'America's Pro-Israel Lobby', AIPAC

netanyahu aipac congress
© REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addresses the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) policy conference in Washington in 2015
Historian Doug Rossinow discusses the creation of AIPAC, which was originally formed to spin positive PR after the 1953 Qibya Massacre (in a now-familiar pattern of non-proportionality, wiping out over 60 Palestinians in revenge for the killing of 3 Israelis). Over the years, the organization has proven that nothing Israel can do can't be spun to deflect the blame or attention elsewhere.

AIPAC, the swaggering and influential American Israel Public Affairs Committee, which brands itself as "America's Pro-Israel Lobby," is holding its annual policy conference. Top politicians from both parties vie for speaking slots at the group's glitzy gala. Everyone pays AIPAC attention. And for good reason. Since the late 1970s, it has informally directed substantial campaign contributions toward chosen candidates for Congress. Its messaging on the Middle East is essential in Washington's foreign-policy conversation.

Some love AIPAC, some hate it, some fear it — but it is a huge factor in U.S. policy, in American politics and in American Jewish life.

Colosseum

Evidence for earthquake 2,800 years ago also mentioned in Bible found in Jerusalem

Jerusalem archaeology
© Eliyahu Yanai/ City of David
Remains of tools discovered in Jerusalem's City of David within a layer of destruction from the 8th century BCE, which coincided with a massive earthquake mentioned in the Bible. The tools were likely shattered during the quake.
Until now, the earliest destruction layer of Jerusalem comes from the Babylonian conquest of 586 BCE. For archaeologists, an earlier historical anchor — if proven through hard, securely dated evidence — serves as an important stratigraphical benchmark for scientific excavations in Jerusalem.

According to Tel Aviv University Prof. Israel Finkelstein, who was not involved in the current research, "destructive earthquakes in Jerusalem are possible, as shown by the well-recorded earthquake of 1927... The early layer of the book of Amos includes materials which relate to the 8th century and hence it is possible that a devastating earthquake left a strong impression and was recorded."

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Hearts

Remains of ancient dogs found among early human ancestral remains in Georgia

dog ancient human
© Artwork made by Mauricio Antón with the scientific supervision by the authors of the manuscript. DOI: 10.1038/s41598-021-92818-4
Image above: Two social species at Dmanisi. (a) altruistic behavior of a group of Homo erectus sharing food with an individual who lived several years without teeth (as evidenced by edentulous skull D3444 and associated mandible D3900). This severe masticatory impairment would limit the diet of the individual to foodstuffs that did not require heavy chewing (e.g., soft plants, animal brain and marrow) or that were orally processed before by others. (b) a pack of hunting dogs chasing a prey (goat Hemitragus albus) by at Venta Micena, a site where a pathological skull (cranium and associated mandible VM-7000) of Canis (Xenocyon) lycaonoides showing marked bilateral asymmetry and agenesia of several teeth was unearthed. The disabled dog, whose absence of an upper canine probably made it useless for hunting, is drawn running far behind the pack. Given that the individual managed to survive until a relatively advanced age, as indicated by tooth wearing, this suggests that the other members of its family group would have allowed it to feed on the prey captured by the hunting pack. Remains of this hypercarnivorous canid species are also preserved in the assemblage of large mammals from Dmanisi, as shown in this paper.
A team of researchers from Italy, Spain and Georgia has found the remains of ancient hunting dogs at a dig site in what is now modern Georgia. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes the fossils they found, their attempts to classify them and the possibility of the dogs interacting with early human ancestors.

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Star of David

CoJiT: the 'anti-extremism' think tank started by sons of Israeli superspy Robert Maxwell

Maxwell family/Mossad
© AGIP
Media mogul Robert Maxwell (second from right) with wife Elizabeth (far left), his son Ian and daughter Ghislaine • January 1990 • MOSSAD emblem
CoJiT's profound and manifold connections to the Israeli security state call into question the Maxwell brothers' motives for founding the think tank, considering how an anti-Muslim extremism agenda could dovetail so easily with a pro-Israeli state one.

If you have not heard of Combating Jihadist Terrorism and Extremism (CoJiT), you are probably not alone. The London-based think tank does not go out of its way to advertise itself. Yet it appears to be having an outsized effect on domestic British policy towards terrorism and surveillance, pushing for more all-encompassing measures against Muslims in the name of fighting terrorism both at home and worldwide.

Yet a closer look at its connections to the notorious Maxwell family — headed by "Israeli superspy" Robert Maxwell and including his daughter Ghislaine and Jeffrey Epstein — as well as its ties to the infamous Department of War Studies at King's College, London, suggests that something else might be afoot.

Comment: No surprise as to the connections and manipulations that comprise the far-reaching and complicated web of Israel's endeavors to overtake, eliminate or control 'all that is not Israel'.

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The notorious London spy school churning out many of the world's top journalists


Cheese

Bronze Age farmers gave preferential treatment to cows over domesticated sheep, goats

cow mountains
© CC0 Public Domain
The movements of ancient crop and animal domesticates across prehistoric Eurasia are well-documented in the archaeological record. What is less well understood: How Bronze Age farmers and herders incorporated newly introduced domesticates — like cows from southwestern Asia — into their long-standing animal husbandry and culinary traditions.

New research led by archaeologists at Washington University in St. Louis shows that meat and dairy played a more significant role in human diets in Bronze Age China than previously thought. The analysis also suggests that farmers and herders tended to sheep and goats differently than they did their cows, unlike in other parts of the world — keeping cows closer to home and feeding them the byproducts of grains that they were growing for their own consumption, like the grass stalks from millet plants.

The study published in Scientific Reports integrates new and previously published data from nine sites along the Hexi Corridor, a key region between the Gobi Desert and Tibetan Plateau that facilitated the movement of ancient crops between Central and East Asia.

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Chalkboard

Australian mathematician discovers applied geometry formulas engraved on 3,700-year-old tablet

geometry formulas babylonian tablet
© UNSW Sydney
Geometry engravings found on Old Babylonian tablet force re-evaluation of other tablets of the era, with Australian scientist saying it shows the ‘society has reached a particular level of mathematical sophistication’.
Old Babylonian tablet likely used for surveying uses Pythagorean triples at least 1,000 years before Pythagoras

An Australian mathematician has discovered what may be the oldest known example of applied geometry, on a 3,700-year-old Babylonian clay tablet.

Known as Si.427, the tablet bears a field plan measuring the boundaries of some land.

The tablet dates from the Old Babylonian period between 1900 and 1600 BCE and was discovered in the late 19th century in what is now Iraq. It had been housed in the Istanbul Archaeological Museum before Dr Daniel Mansfield from the University of New South Wales tracked it down.

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Star of David

Revealed: In 1971, Israel secretly kept innocent Palestinians in remote detention centers

sinai camps israel palestinian
© Red Cross Archive
The Israeli government built secret detention centers for Palestinians in the years following the Six-Day War. (Pictured: the Red Cross visit the Abu Zenima camp in October, 1971.)
An investigative report reveals that hundreds of Gazans, including families of suspected Fatah agitators, and young men not suspected of anything were jailed in Israeli detention centers in 1971 for almost a year.

In 1971, under heavy secrecy, Israel built two detention centers in the Sinai Peninsula where innocent Palestinians were sent. One was used for the families of Fatah members who were suspected of terrorism, one was for unemployed young men.

Children, women and men were transported from the Gaza Strip by the Israeli army and put in improvised buildings in the middle of the desert. They spent various stretches there - sometimes even months - in conditions the Red Cross called "unbearable." Less than a year later, both camps were closed and all the detainees were returned to Gaza. The minutes of the meetings on the subject were classified as secret for 50 years, some for even longer.

Archaeology

Neanderthals were painting caves in Europe long before modern humans, study finds

neanderthals art caves spain
© Pedro Cantalejo-Duarte
Red markings, which date back to more than 60,000 years ago, were made on a massive stalagmite 325 feet (100 meters) into Cueva de Ardales near Málaga, Spain.
Whether Neanderthals thought symbolically and had an artistic sensibility has been a question that has vexed experts in human evolution.

But evidence is mounting that our Stone Age cousins were our cognitive equals and created forms of art in Europe long before Homo sapiens were on the scene.

A new study of a rock feature stained red in a cave in southern Spain has concluded that the red pigment - made from ocher - was intentionally painted, most likely by Neanderthals, refuting earlier research that said the red marks were natural.