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Suspected attack on Hagen synagogue leads to arrest of four in Germany

Hagen synagogue

Police protection was increased for the Hagen synagogue
Police have arrested four people over a possible attack on a synagogue in western Germany ahead of a major Jewish holiday. Authorities believe the threat was motivated by "Islamist ideology."

German police have arrested "several people," including a teenager, over a threat of an attack on a synagogue on the Jewish holiday of Yom Kippur.

Hagen police said they arrested four people as a result of their investigation into the threat and had searched several buildings.

Comment: See also: And check out SOTT radio's:


Bizarro Earth

Queensland MPs vote to legalise voluntary euthanasia for those with terminal illness

Palaszczuk
© Darren England/AAP
Queensland premier Annastacia Palaszczuk spoke about the deaths of family members during an emotional debate on new voluntary assisted dying laws.
Queensland has passed laws that will allow voluntary assisted dying for people with a terminal illness, with an overwhelming majority of MPs voting in favour.

The state - often perceived as Australia's most socially conservative - becomes the fifth Australian jurisdiction to allow voluntary euthanasia.

The state parliament voted 60 to 29 in favour, despite a fierce campaign by faith-based groups and attempts by opponents to introduce amendments that would have imposed barriers to access the new scheme.


Comment: In the case of Ireland, the Committee of Justice found those pushing for amendments were right to be concerned and the bill was eventually scraped.


Comment: It's certainly a nuanced issue but this apparent push across numerous countries to legalise voluntary euthanasia, repeated attempts to get the vulnerable to sign Do Not Resuscitate forms, and campaigns to extend abortion term limits, is rather ominous: Also check out SOTT radio's: NewsReal: The Great (End)Game - Closing the Afghan War, Opening the 'Covid War'?




Heart - Black

2015 Paris attacks suspect: Deaths of 130 'nothing personal'

Salah Abdeslam
© Noelle Herrenschmidt via AP
This courtroom sketch shows key defendant Salah Abdeslam, in the special courtroom built for the 2015 attacks trial, Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2021 in Paris. The trial of 20 men accused in the Islamic State group's coordinated attacks on Paris in 2015 that transformed France opened Wednesday in a custom-built complex embedded within a 13th-century courthouse.
The key defendant in the 2015 Paris attacks trial said Wednesday that the coordinated killings were retaliation for French airstrikes on the Islamic State group, calling the deaths of 130 innocent people "nothing personal" as he acknowledged his role for the first time.

Salah Abdeslam, who wore all black and declined to remove his mask as he spoke in a custom-built courtroom, has been silent throughout the investigation. Observers were waiting to see if he would offer any details during the trial.

Nine Islamic State group gunmen and suicide bombers struck within minutes of one another at several locations around Paris on Nov. 13, 2015, targeting fans at the national soccer stadium and cafe-goers and ending with a bloodbath inside the Bataclan concert hall. It was the deadliest violence to strike France since World War II and among the worst terror attacks to hit the West, shaking the country's sense of security and rewriting its politics.

Abdeslam is the only survivor of that cell, most of whose members were French or Belgian. After his suicide vest malfunctioned on the night of the attacks, he fled to his hometown of Brussels.

On Wednesday, a screen in the courtroom showed a photo of the car Abdeslam abandoned in northern Paris after he dropped off the three suicide bombers at the national stadium. Abdeslam's target was unclear, but when Islamic State claimed responsibility the next day, the statement alluded to an attack in the neighborhood where he left the car that never took place.

Attention

Herron long-term care residents died of thirst, malnourishment, not Covid, Quebec coroner's inquest told

Residence Herron care facility
© CHRISTINNE MUSCHI/REUTERS
A woman prays as she leaves flowers outside Residence Herron on April 13, 2020, a senior's long-term care facility in the suburb of Dorval in Montreal.
COVID-19 was repeatedly cited as a cause of death at the Herron nursing home to obscure the fact that dozens of elderly residents died from thirst, malnourishment and neglect, a Quebec coroner's inquest heard Tuesday.

In an emotional testimony, an auxiliary nurse recalled how the facility in Montreal's West Island was already poorly run before the crisis, how most of its staff abandoned their posts when the coronavirus struck, and how the local health authority then took over in a high-handed and inefficient manner.

She described discussions over whether to triage residents in such a way that those who were dying wouldn't be fed. And she recalled harrowing scenes: a woman's body left unattended in a room shared with her husband, and nurses quarrelling in front of grieving family members.

The auxiliary nurse testified at coroner Géhane Kamel's public hearings into 47 deaths at Herron, a part of an inquest into the high death toll in Quebec nursing homes during the first wave of the pandemic. Quebec is the only province holding public hearings on COVID-19 fatalities in long-term care, opening a rare window into a crisis that resulted in the deaths of more than 4,000 of the province's care-home residents in the spring of 2020.

A recurring theme in the auxiliary nurse's testimony was the lack of humanity afforded to dying residents and their relatives. One appeared to have died of thirst after being forgotten in his room. Another family received misleading information even as an elderly resident was dying.

Attention

Alberta introduces new rules, passport as COVID puts health system 'days from collapse'

Alberta Premier Jason Kenney canada covid passports
© THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney announces new COVID-19 measures for Alberta in Calgary, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021.
Alberta Premier Jason Kenney, facing a COVID-19 crisis that is threatening to collapse its health system in just over a week, has reintroduced limits on gatherings along with elements of a vaccine passport system.

Alberta is also asking for help from other provinces to use their intensive care beds and staff while prepping its triage protocols, which would see doctors forced to choose who gets life-saving treatment and who does not.

The United Conservative government declared Wednesday a state of public health emergency.

Comment: Alberta has been somewhat split as to its actions regarding Covid. Deep blue cities, such as Calgary, have implemented draconian measures, including shutting down churches. The premiere (keeping re-election prospects in mind) has tried to opt for milder rules, as the majority of the province is conservative-leaning. A hard balancing act, especially with Canada's Covid cheerleader-in-chief, Justin Trudeau breathing down his neck.


Cult

The ethical bankruptcy of vaccinating 12-15 year-olds

children teens vaccination
We're publishing an original piece today by a senior pharmaceutical company executive setting out the ethical case against vaccinating healthy 12-15 year-olds against SARS-CoV-2. He points out that the risk of myocarditis alone is greater than any potential benefit of being vaccinated for this cohort. There are 3,200,000 12-15 year-olds in the U.K. and if you give a single dose of the vaccine to every one, according to the JCVI, you're likely to prevent seven children ending up in the paediatric ICU. That's not seven per million; that's seven in total. But, according to the same source, the risk of a 12-15 year-old who's received one dose developing myocarditis is 3-17 per million, so if every child in this cohort receives one dose between 9-54 will develop vaccine-induced myocarditis. Since we don't know the long-term impact of myocarditis on a person's health, this data suggests the risk of vaccinating 12-15 year-olds outweighs the risk - and that's to ignore all the other potential side effects of the Covid vaccines.

Here are two key paragraphs, although the whole piece is excellent:

Comment: For more information on the mechanism of the vaccine damage see:

Objective:Health: - Cardiovascular Side Effects From mRNA Vaccines


NPC

Covid's Willing Executioners

How have previously normal people become so eager to deal out death in judgment?

milgram experiment

A subject in the famous Milgram experiment, administering electric shocks just because he’s told to.
A few weeks ago, three friends on Facebook told me that they wished for my death.

One of them I didn't really know. He freaked out when I calmly suggested there were viable treatment options for those with Covid. He responded: "Stay out of my life!! I hope you get Covid and die!"

The other two friends were people I knew in college 45 years ago, one was my freshman year roommate, and the other guy introduced me to my first wife. He suggested that I prove Darwin's theory and perish from the virus, the other just basically said I deserved what was coming as a selfish unvaccinated science-denier.

Covid's willing executioners.

I know Facebook is certainly not the ideal place for reasonable discourse. As a psychologist, however, I do find it an interesting sample of a certain extreme way of thinking and behaving.

Red Flag

Ohio mayor: School board should resign over material suggesting kids write about sex, drinking

children
The Hudson mayor is asking all five school board members to resign or face possible criminal charges over high school course material that he said a judge called "child pornography."

Mayor Craig Shubert made the statement during Monday night's board of education meeting after multiple parents complained about the content of some writing prompts contained in a book called "642 Things to Write About" provided to high school students who are taking a college credit course called Writing in the Liberal Arts II.

Parents said there was a prompt that asked students to "write a sex scene you wouldn't show your mom," and another which said "rewrite the sex scene from above into one that you'd let your mom read."

Briefcase

220,000 military service members say 'no' to Biden's forced Covid injections: File lawsuit claiming they already have natural immunity

vaccines in military
The Biden administration is trying to redefine the meaning of the word "immunity" in its attempt to force the Covid injection on 220,000 U.S. military service members who have already contracted and survived the SARS COV-2 virus that originated in Wuhan, China.

This has opened the door for a federal lawsuit filed August 30 by two active-duty service members against Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, Homeland Security Director Xavier Bacerra and U.S. Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Janet Woodcock.

The Navy this week gave its sailors 90 days to get the shot and the Army and Air Force were poised Thursday to enforce their own timetables, reported Military.com.

The suit, filed August 30 in U.S. District Court in Colorado, seeks immediate injunctive relief.

The two plaintiffs, Daniel Robert, a 33-year-old drill sergeant at Fort Benning Army base in Columbus, Georgia, and Hollie Mulvihill, a 29-year-old staff sergeant at the Marine Corp base in Jacksonville, North Carolina, are asking the court for a temporary restraining order preventing the forced injections before a full hearing can be scheduled. They are ultimately seeking a permanent injunction and declaratory judgment against Biden's Department of Defense.

Bad Guys

Coronavirus: Sydney to lift curfew as infections stabilise, vaccination rates surge

Sydney
© AFP
Sydney’s curfew in Covid-19 hotspots will end as cases stabilise, with authorities saying many restrictions will lift when 70 per cent of the city’s residents are fully vaccinated, sometime in October.
Sydney authorities moved to lift curfews for coronavirus hotspots on Wednesday, as infection numbers stabilized and vaccination rates surged, almost three months after activity in Australia's largest city was frozen by lockdown orders.

New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the 9pm to 5am curfew for virus hotspots would be lifted from Wednesday, in what Sydney residents hope signals the beginning of the end of a long lockdown.

Infection rates appear to have plateaued at around 1,300 a day and 80 per cent of people in Australia's most populous state have received at least one vaccine dose.
"We've seen a stabilisation in the last few days," said state premier Berejiklian, while urging residents to continue to be vigilant and respect stay-at-home orders. "We don't want to see that trend go the wrong way."

Comment: See also: