Welcome to Sott.net
Thu, 06 Aug 2020
The World for People who Think

Society's Child
Map

Stormtrooper

US, Wisconsin: She Dialed 911. The Cop Who Came to Help Raped Her

Image
© Newscom/, Jonathan A. Meyers

Milwaukee police officer Lamarald Cates is charged with rape.
A young woman in Milwaukee, Wisconsin called the cops when someone threw a brick through her window. One of the cops who came to help raped her.

When the brick crashed through her bathroom window and somebody began kicking in her front door, the 19-year-old single mother of two in Milwaukee dialed what are supposed to be the most trustworthy three numbers.

"I called 911 for help," she later said in court. "I didn't call 911 to be the victim."

Within minutes, two police officers responded. One took her 15-year-old brother outside to speak to him. The other cop, Police Officer Ladmarald Cates, gave her boyfriend $10 and told him to go the store and get some water. She told him that he was welcome to chilled water from her refrigerator.

"I only drink bottled water," Cates said.

Her boyfriend has a pronounced limp and set off with no promise of returning soon. Cates asked to see the broken window and she led him down a narrow hallway to a bathroom in the back. She felt sure that jealous neighbors had attacked her happy home because she dared to defy what seemed surely to be her fate as an inner-city teenage single mom.

"I wanted to be a good example to my kids," she would later say. "I wanted to learn something, be somebody."

She had returned to high school as a mother of two and after graduation she had continued on to the University of Wisconsin, where she was studying criminal justice with the thought of becoming police officer or a lawyer.

"I thought I was going pretty good," she would recall.

She now stood on a floor littered with broken glass and pointed to the brick. The cop she had summoned to protect her instead chose this moment to grab the back of her head by her hair and sodomize her. Then he raped her.

Palette

US, Nevada: Controversial Artist Depicts Obama Trampling The Constitution

Image
© Jon McNaughton
In front of the White House a man is sitting on a park bench in the throes of depression. He is surrounded by all 43 presidents. In the forefront, purposefully ignoring the depressed man is President Obama, whose right foot is stepping on the Constitution. James Madison is next to Obama, pleading with him to stop.

This tableau is called The Forgotten Man, a painting by Jon McNaughton, an artist who is known for his politically-charged work.

The painting, which uses objects such as discarded dollar bills as symbols and scraps of paper with individual constitutional amendments scrawled onto them, has been making the rounds across the Internet.

The painting was initially released in 2010 and has resurfaced, causing a stir when it appeared for a caption contest on MSNBC's Rachel Maddow's blog.

The responses have ranged from sarcastic - "We'll trade you this peasant for that constitution. We'll even throw in the bench." - to Photoshop works of art.

Evil Rays

Full-Body Scans Rolled Out at All Australian International Airports

scanned by a TSA full body scanner.
© n/a
An airport employee in the US raises her hands as she is scanned by a TSA full body scanner.
Passengers at airports across Australia will be forced to undergo full-body scans or be banned from flying under new laws to be introduced into Federal Parliament this week.

In a radical $28 million security overhaul, the scanners will be installed at all international airports from July and follows trials at Sydney and Melbourne in August and September last year.

The Government is touting the technology as the most advanced available, with the equipment able to detect metallic and non-metallic items beneath clothing.

It's also keen to allay concerns raised on travel online forums that passengers would appear nude on security screens as they had when similar scanners were introduced at US airports.

The technology will show passengers on a screen as stick figures of neither sex.

Heart - Black

US: Neil Steinberg: Rape Victims Get Short Shrift in Illinois

Image
© Al Podgorski/Chicago Sun-Times
Advocate Condell Medical Center staff members are trained through the SANE ­— Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner — program (from left): Jennifer Slominski, Jody Jesse, Karen Stramich, Khyati Yazdani and Patti Sliozis
After Katie Feifer was raped at knifepoint by a man who pushed his way into her Oak Park home, her assailant tied her up in the basement and left.

She freed herself and called police, who took her to the emergency room at West Suburban Hospital.

"It's funny how vivid the memories are, even after all these years," Feifer says of her treatment after the 1988 attack. "A resident came in, and had this rape kit, and started opening envelopes and vials. He was fumbling around and he was very, very nervous. He did a pelvic exam, and kept apologizing. 'I'm sorry I have to do this. I'm sorry. I'm sorry.'

"I remember feeling I had to comfort him and make him feel OK. This guy was supposed to be examining me and helping me, and he didn't know what he was doing."

There is no shortage of jarring rape statistics.

Illinois State Police data reported 5,300 rapes statewide last year - more than 14 a day - though experts believe the actual number is triple that. Most go unreported, in part because the majority of rape victims are children - 54 percent, according to the Illinois Attorney General's office.

Che Guevara

Russia: Tens of Thousands Brave Moscow Cold to Protest Against Putin

The third mass protest in Moscow in two months against Russia leader Vladimir Putin and demanding fair elections appeared to have been the largest yet.


Undeterred by subzero temperatures that froze their breath and left icicles adorning many men's mustaches and beards, tens of thousands of Russians marched through the streets of Moscow on Saturday demanding fair elections just a month before they are to go to the polls to choose a new president.

Despite fear that the frigid weather and bickering among the opposition would curb the turnout, the third mass protest in two months against the rule of Russian leader Vladimir Putin appeared to have been the largest Moscow has seen in a generation.

Authorities clocked the turnout at 36,000, bigger than either of the December demonstrations. Opposition leaders estimated that 120,000 demonstrators swarmed Moscow's Bolotnaya Square, while demonstrators said they believed they numbered 50,000 to 100,000.

After passing through a row of metal detectors, a throng of protesters marched about a mile to reach Bolotnaya Square, on an island in the center of the Moscow River.

Nuke

US, California: San Onofre plant worker falls in reactor pool

Image
© Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images
A plant worker fell in a San Onofre reactor pool, but suffered no significant exposure to radiation.
A veteran at the San Onofre nuclear plant fell into a reactor pool, but suffered no major radiation exposure.

A plant worker at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in San Diego fell inside a reactor pool last week, but he didn't suffer any major radiation exposure, the North County Times reported.

According to Southern California Edison spokesman Gil Alexander, the man was leaning over to pick up a flashlight he had dropped when he lost his balance and fell into the Unit 2 reactor pool, the Associated Press reported. The pool, 20 feet deep, was filled with water that circulates through the reactor core.

"He was wearing all of the appropriate safety equipment, including a life preserver vest. We immediately began a thorough medical screening to determine if there had been any injury," Alexander said, the North County Times reported.

Bomb

Blast hits Egypt's gas pipeline to Israel

An explosion hit a gas pipeline running from Egypt to Israel on Sunday, witnesses and state television reported.

The pipeline, which also supplies gas to Jordan, has come under attack at least 12 times since Egyptian resident Hosni Mubarak was toppled in 2011.

The latest blast took place in the Massaeed area west of the Mediterranean coastal town of al-Arish. Gas pumping was stopped after the explosion.

Residents in al-Arish told Reuters they could see flames from their town. Security forces and fire trucks raced to the scene, witnesses said.

Security in Sinai loosened after Mubarak's fall as the police presence thinned out across Egypt.

Book

Iraq: An Education in Occupation and Institutional Destruction

Bush-Mission Accomplished
© Stephen Jaffe/AFP/Getty Images
As the last American soldiers left Iraq in December, so, too, did many of the journalists who had covered the war, leaving little in the way of media coverage of post-war Iraq. While there were some notable exceptions -- including two fine articles by MIT's John Tirman that asked how many Iraqis had been killed as a result of the US invasion -- overall the American press published few articles on the effects of the occupation, especially the consequences for Iraqis.

As a college professor, I have a special interest in what happened to Iraqi universities under US occupation. The story is not pretty.

Until the 1990s, Iraq had perhaps the best university system in the Middle East. Saddam Hussein's regime used oil revenues to underwrite free tuition for Iraqi university students -- churning out doctors, scientists, and engineers who joined the country's burgeoning middle class and anchored development. Although political dissent was strictly off-limits, Iraqi universities were professional, secular institutions that were open to the West, and spaces where male and female, Sunni and Shia mingled. Also the schools pushed hard to educate women who constituted 30 percent of Iraqi university faculties by 1991. (This is, incidentally, better than Princeton was doing as late as 2009.) With a reputation for excellence, Iraqi universities attracted many students from surrounding countries -- the same countries that are now sheltering the thousands of Iraqi professors who have fled US-occupied Iraq.

Iraqi universities began their decline in the 12 years after the 1991 Gulf War. As the international sanctions regime cut off journal subscriptions and equipment purchases, academic salaries fell precipitously, and 10,000 Iraqi professors left the country. Those faculty who remained were increasingly closed off from new developments in their fields.

V

US: 'Occupy Austin' Evicted; Seven Arrested, One Hospitalized

occupy protestor detained @ Austin
© Ann Harkness via Flickr Commons
Occupy Austin protesters were evicted from the steps of Austin's City Hall last night on orders from the office of City Manager Mark Ott. Seven arrests were made and one 58-year-old protester was hospitalized, says a report posted this afternoon on the Austin Chronicle web site.

Rumors of an eviction have swirled for days, the article says, but protesters were finally ordered to leave at 9:30 Friday night. At 10:45 p.m. a group of 50 police arrived by bus and began to clear the area.

Protesters reconvened at Republic Square Park and began to march up Sixth Street, webcasting the event until it became clear that police were using the webcast to track and surround the group.

Seven arrests were made in total, including videographer Corey Williams, 'Occupy Austin' organizers, and 58-year-old Claire Hirschkind who fell to the ground and was taken to Brackenridge Hospital. City officials say that Hirschkind has a history of seizures but witnesses say she was pushed down by police.

New regulations put in place by the City Manager prohibit any non-city usage of the area between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. and bar the use of "sleeping, camping and the use or storage of sleeping equipment." A reservation is now required by any group wishing to use the area's mezzanine and amphitheater.

Protesters who were arrested face charges of criminal trespass.

Whistle

Bradley Manning Nobel Peace Prize Nomination 2012

Image
© Free Bradley Manning
February 1st 2012 the entire parliamentary group of The Movement of the Icelandic Parliament nominated Private Bradley Manning for the Nobel Peace Prize. Following is the reasoning we sent to the committee explaining why we felt compelled to nominate Private Bradley Manning for this important recognition of an individual effort to have an impact for peace in our world.

Our letter to the Nobel Peace Prize Committee:

We have the great honor of nominating Private First Class Bradley Manning for the 2012 Nobel Peace Prize. Manning is a soldier in the United States army who stands accused of releasing hundreds of thousands of documents to the whistleblower website WikiLeaks. The leaked documents pointed to a long history of corruption, war crimes, and imperialism by the United States government in international dealings. These revelations have fueled democratic uprising around the world, including a democratic revolution in Tunisia. According to journalists, his alleged actions helped motivate the democratic Arab Spring movements, shed light on secret corporate influence on our foreign policies, and most recently contributed to the Obama Administration agreeing to withdraw all U.S.troops from the occupation in Iraq.