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Sheriff

Australian police force group raises thousands to legally challenge Covid-19 vaccination mandate

Queensland Police
© Greg Wood / AFP
Queensland police officers have set up a fundraising page, garnering money to hire a lawyer and challenge the mandating of vaccines for law enforcement employees. They say the new directive "infringes upon the right to freedom."

The initiative, coming from "a group of concerned Queensland police officers and their families," had raised over $45,000 by Saturday - twice as much as their initial goal.

Police officers, who claim the matter "is not pro- or anti- vaccine," say they need the money to get legal help and work with a law practice to challenge a recently introduced measure to fight the spread of coronavirus. According to the newly implemented directive from the Queensland Police Service (QPS) Commissioner Katarina Carroll, "the entire workforce in all QPS workplaces within the next five months" must be subjected to vaccinations and be fully inoculated by January next year.

Comment: See also:


Attention

Explosion tears through 3 floors of apartment block in Georgia, US, 20 other buildings damaged

georgia explosion
Officials on scene have indicated that at least four people have suffered injuries as a result of the blast. It's unclear whether the incident prompted any fatalities, but first responders have stated that two individuals remain unaccounted for.

An explosion rocked an apartment building in a northern suburb of Atlanta, Georgia, on Sunday, the Dunwoody police department said.

"We are on scene with the Dekalb Co. and Sandy Springs Fire Dept. This is a very active scene and the cause of the explosion is under investigation", the police tweeted.

Comment: The uptick in explosions and fires is certainly beginning to add up: See also: SOTT Exclusive: The growing threat of underground fires and explosions


Mr. Potato

Brian Stelter hit with epic social media ratio for quoting story claiming US leaders were 'in the bunker' on 9/11

Brian Stelter CNN
© Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for CNN
CNN’s Brian Stelter was confronted by a C-SPAN caller who told him the network is “dividing our nation."
'Have some respect if you have no shame,' one social media user responded

CNN's Brian Stelter was slammed for tweeting out a piece from the Associated Press claiming network TV anchors were "the closest thing that America had to national leaders on 9/11."

"Most Americans were guided through the unimaginable by one of three anchors: Tom Brokaw of NBC News, Peter Jennings of ABC and Dan Rather of CBS," AP writer David Bauder wrote.

Stelter added his own two cents that "political leaders were in bunkers or otherwise out of sight" during the terror attacks, which occurred 20 years ago on Saturday.

Comment: A few more:






Family

Catalonia's separatists rally as divisions appear over upcoming talks with Spain

catalonia flag rally spain
© Associated Press
Separatist demonstrators display the flag of Catalonia
Tens of thousands of Catalans have rallied for independence from the rest of Spain in their first major mass gathering since the start of the pandemic

Catalan separatists held their first major mass gathering since the start of the pandemic on Saturday, trying to offer a display of unity despite the divisions in their ranks over upcoming talks with the Spanish government.

Tens of thousands waved pro-independence flags and wore T-shirts with messages for their cause in downtown Barcelona. People used face masks for the event, which went ahead after regional authorities dropped restrictions on the number of people who could gather with COVID-19 cases dropping.

There was a moment of tension when a large crowd pelted a police station with toilet paper, trash and other objects, prompting police in riot vans to roll in and clear them out.

Comment: The situation has heated up again after a 4-year hiatus:


Briefcase

Former Theranos employees get ready to relive the Sh*tshow

Holmes
© The Daily Beast/Getty Images
Elizabeth Holmes
In the summer of 2014, Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes was at the height of her power. The media and her cadre of distinguished supporters were hailing the self-made billionaire as the next Steve Jobs, someone set to revolutionize the world of medicine with a device that could run hundreds of blood tests — all with the prick of a finger.

But behind this dazzling facade, all was not well. As federal prosecutors would later allege, the Silicon Valley tech firm, its evangelizing inventor, and her one-time boyfriend were peddling snake oil: Theranos' device simply did not work.

Now Holmes, 37, is about to stand trial, and ex-Theranos employees are watching closely. Some describe themselves as survivors of a startup ruled by paranoia, subterfuge, bullying, and retaliation. And they want Holmes to pay.

Justin Maxwell, who worked at the company as a designer from 2007 to 2008 said:
"We knew Theranos to be a deceptive organization, but we had to chill out and not say anything about it because they would make our lives difficult. There are some people who probably had to go to therapy for this, and there's one person on the team who died from suicide."
Holmes and Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani, her ex-boyfriend and the former president of Theranos, are both charged with defrauding investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and endangering patients with a technology that didn't function as advertised. The pair, who will be tried separately, each pleaded not guilty to nine counts of wire fraud and two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud.
Holmes/Clinton/Ma
© Brendan McDermid/Reuters
Elizabeth Holmes was riding high in 2015 when she spoke with Bill Clinton and Alibaba Group chairman Jack Ma at the Clinton Global Initiative’s annual meeting.

Arrow Down

Illinois ethics reform uncertain after house rejects Pritzker's amendatory veto

Pritzker
© Illinois Rising Action
Illinois Governor J.B. Pritzker
Illinois made an important first step in its break with the corrupt practices that defined the legislative process under former Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan. New ethics rules about lobbying, financial disclosures and the legislative watchdog were passed in the final hours of the session, but the reforms may die after the House rejected a technical change to the legislation by Gov. J.B. Pritzker.

The Illinois General Assembly on Aug. 31 rejected an amendatory veto to Senate Bill 539, throwing the fate of corruption reform in Illinois into question.

There were some solid advances in the bill, but there was also room for improvement and a promise to keep working on some provisions before Senate Bill 539 takes effect Jan. 1, 2022. The bill was improved from earlier versions and incorporated many measures advocated by Illinois Policy.

The governor's amendatory veto made a minor technical fix.

Because the governor vetoed the bill, both Houses of the General Assembly had to approve the changes. The Senate did approve the governor's amendatory veto, but the measure failed in the House, with 59 representatives voting to approve the change, 35 voting to reject the change, and 24 representatives casting no vote on the measure.

The General Assembly now has less than two weeks to take up the corruption package again, otherwise it will die. That means Illinois politicians will have reneged on their promise to tackle the state's rampant public corruption problem.

Comment: How many other state legislatures should be in these same or similar crosshairs?


Attention

The Taliban are lying, France's foreign minister says

Weimar Triangle meeting/taliban
© www.avapress.com/KJN
Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian • Members of the Taliban
The Taliban are lying and France will not have any relationship with its newly-formed government, Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said late on Saturday before heading for talks in Qatar on Sunday to discuss future evacuations from Afghanistan.

Le Drian said on France 5 TV:
"They said they would let some foreigners and Afghans leave freely and (talked) of an inclusive and representative government, but they are lying.

"France refuses to recognise or have any type of relationship with this government. We want actions from the Taliban and they will need some economic breathing space and international relations. It's up to them."
Paris has evacuated about 3,000 people and had held technical talks with the Taliban to enable those departures.

Le Drian, who is heading to the Qatari capital Doha on Sunday, said there were still a few French nationals and a few hundred Afghans with ties to France remaining in Afghanistan.

Comment: A rough road ahead for French and Afghanistan relations:
For the time being, France is not planning any relations with the radical Islamic Taliban ruling Afghanistan.

Paris - It is now up to the Taliban to keep their promises, Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian told France 5 on Saturday. "You are lying (with all your promises), and at the moment the results are not there." Le Drian emphasized: "We expect the Taliban to act."

Le Drian travels to Qatar on Sunday to speak about further evacuations after the chaotic international withdrawal from Afghanistan. There are still "a few French" who have to be flown out, as well as a few hundred Afghans who are threatened because they have ties to French institutions or are involved in areas that the Taliban hate, he said.

France had flown almost 3,000 people from Afghanistan in August, including 2,600 Afghans. After the international withdrawal, Qatar organized civil evacuation flights for numerous nations.

Qatar is a key player in the Afghanistan crisis. In the Gulf state, negotiations between the Taliban and the US government about a troop withdrawal from Afghanistan took place in 2020. Negotiations were later held in Qatar between the militia and the Afghan government at the time.



Light Saber

'The US government is censoring private conversations,' says the 'conversion therapist' fighting a legal battle not to be silenced

loneliness isolation
© Getty Images / xijian
Brian Tingley is taking on the state of Washington for the right to continue counselling young people concerned about their sexuality. He believes the attempt to stop his work violates his right to freedom of speech.

Should private discussions between a counsellor and minors worried about their sexuality be allowed? Therapist Brian Tingley believes they should, and has taken to the courts to fight his case. Brian and his team are keen to overturn a district court decision in the state of Washington to reject his challenge to a law that prohibits 'sexual orientation change therapy' for young people.

Tingley has been widely depicted as practising conversion therapy, a charge he refutes. In his opinion, the crux of the matter comes down to whether the government should determine what happens during therapy sessions. Speaking to RT, he said,
"I've been a counsellor for over 20 years and until recently the government never told me what I could say and not say in my sessions. This law violates freedom of speech in a very private setting, a counselling office."

Cult

Drone pilot and whistleblower to RT: Going from 'video game sniper' to remote killer withers away who you are

drone whistleblower Brandon Bryant
© RT
Brandon Bryant
Targeted killings by US drones are notoriously prone to claiming civilian lives. It takes a toll on drone pilots too, as the job slowly eats away their souls, an ex-operator told RT in an interview for the Unheard Voices project.

Brandon Bryant served in the US military between 2006 and 2011, targeting drone strikes from the Cannon Air Force Base in New Mexico. His job was to point a laser at where a Hellfire missile fired by a coworker from a Predator drone should hit. He estimates that he personally contributed to the deaths of 13 people.

After the first time he helped kill three people that he believed were innocent, he called his mother, crying. "She told me it was good that I felt bad about it, because if I felt good about it I would just be another psychopath," he recalled.

Comment:


Broom

UK dumps 800,000 AstraZeneca doses as vaccine uptake falls

AstraZeneca
© Oli Scarff/AFP
The AstraZeneca vaccine has a six-month shelf-life in the fridge
Up to 800,000 doses of the AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine are likely to have expired across the UK at the end of August, analysis suggests, and could now be thrown away.

The doses were destined for use in the UK rollout, but after the Government recommended in May that younger people should get an alternative jab because of the blood clot risk linked to the AstraZeneca jab, take-up dramatically slowed.


Comment: This is sinister misdirection, because, Israel, that was proclaimed to be a 'laboratory' for its exclusive use of Pfizer's mRNA injection, has seen equal if not worse suffering by young people from serious side effects: Pfizer vaccine in Israel: Mortality rate 'hundreds of times greater in vaccinated young people'


GPs told The Telegraph they had been raising concerns over leftover doses for some time, including one who wrote to his MP in a bid to re-purpose the jabs after exhausting other options.

Comment: The story is much the same across the planet, those that were caught up in the manufactured hysteria got their experimental injection as soon as they were able; the next percentage did so slowly and reluctantly, primarily due to the increasingly coercive tactics of their government, like rolling lockdowns and the threat of vaccine passports; and, now, those that remain continue to decline the offer to suffer an injection that has been dogged by scandal and that they know they do not need.

It's likely that, as reports of severe side effects continue to increase, even more injections will go to waste as increasing numbers of people realise the risks the injections pose is much higher than that of the relatively harmless coronavirus: Also check out SOTT radio's: NewsReal: Pandemic is Over! (If You Want it)