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Bomb

US: Death toll hits 5 in Hawaii fireworks bunker blast

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© KITV / AP
This image provided by KITV shows the entrance to the bunker where fireworks were stored at Waikele Business Center Friday, April 8, 2011 in Waipahu, Hawaii. At least two men were killed, injuring two others and two are missing after the explosion.
A bomb squad recovered the bodies of two more people Saturday who had been missing after a fireworks storage bunker blast in Hawaii, bringing the death toll to five, officials said.

The blast near the Waikele Business Center at a former military bunker where fireworks were warehoused occurred Friday, killing three people and leaving two the others missing.

The bodies of the two missing men were found Saturday, Honolulu Fire Department Capt. Gary Lum told The Associated Press.

Officials said the bunker burned throughout the day Friday and had been too hot and unstable to enter.

A police robot searched the facility Saturday to see whether explosions had stopped and whether the temperature had dropped low enough for rescuers to risk going in, Lum said.

"It wasn't as hot as yesterday but it was still warm. The bomb team went in ... in protective equipment and they were able to retrieve one victim at a time," he said.

Nuke

Radioactive water to be moved to storage in Japan's plant

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© Xinhua/Reuters
Water is seen rushing into the compound of the Fukushima Dai-ni nuclear power plant after a tsunami was triggered by the March 11, 2011 earthquake in Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan, in this handout photo released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. to Reuters on April 10, 2011.
Highly radioactive water filling an underground trench at the troubled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant are expected on Sunday to be moved to a nearby storage inside the No. 2 reactor turbine building, local media reported.

The water inside the basement of the No. 2 reactor turbine building and the trench connected to it is highly contaminated because it is believed to be originating from the No. 2 reactor core, where fuel rods have partially melted, Kyodo News reported.

The water in the trench is planned to be moved to a "condenser" inside the No. 2 reactor turbine building. The condenser has a capacity to store 3,000 tons of liquid.

Pistol

US: 2 shot dead, 8 wounded at teen party near Philadelphia

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© The Associated Press / Delaware County Daily Times, Eric Hartline Philly Metro Out
Israel Laboy, second from left, father of Robel Laboy who was shot and killed Friday night, is comforted by family members at a candlelight vigil in Chester, Pa. Authorities say shots rang out Friday night at a social hall where a teenage party was being held, killing two people and sending eight others to hospitals.
Shots rang out in a suburban Philadelphia social hall where a teenage party was being held, killing two people and sending eight others to hospitals, authorities said Saturday.

Police in Chester, where a state of emergency was declared last summer because of crime concerns, said a suspect was taken into custody after officers were called to the Minaret Temple No. 174 around 11:30 p.m. Friday and found "numerous victims."

Police said nine people were transported to Crozer Chester Medical Center, where a spokesman said one died soon afterward and another died Saturday afternoon. Four other victims remained in stable condition, and three had been discharged, the spokesman said. A 10th person was treated at Taylor Hospital and was released.

The social hall had been rented for a party, and many teenagers were present when the shots were fired, police said. Detectives were investigating the cause of the shooting and declined to release further information. A man answering the phone at the hall said he had come in to see the condition of the building but declined to comment further.

The Delaware County Daily Times newspaper said neighbors and community leaders planned a candlelight vigil at the scene Saturday night.

Stormtrooper

Canada: RCMP use Taser on 11-year-old British Columbia boy

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© CBC News
RCMP said a Taser-type weapon was used on an 11-year-old stabbing suspect in Prince George, B.C., Thursday.
The RCMP has confirmed that one of its officers used a Taser to subdue an 11-year-old boy after a stabbing in Prince George, B.C.

Police used the electrical stun weapon after responding to a 911 call about an incident at a home in the city at about 5:30 p.m. PT Thursday.

After officers arrived at the residence, "police confirmed that a 37-year-old male had been allegedly stabbed by an 11-year-old male," RCMP Supt. Brenda Butterworth-Carr, commander of the Prince George detachment, said in a statement Friday.

Butterworth-Carr said officers located the young suspect at a nearby property.

"Efforts were made to get the individual out of the house, and when he emerged from the home, a Conducted Energy Weapon was deployed by a member," Butterworth-Carr said.

The police statement provided no details about what led police to use the stun gun.

Cut

Americans Just Took a Pay Cut As Inflation Outpaces Wages

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You may not have noticed it when you opened up your paycheck last month, but you just took a pay cut.

Wages in America are flattening as inflation surges, therefore real income growth is actually negative, according to the latest data from the Labor Department.

Average hourly earnings in March were flat compared to the previous month for the second time in a row. On an annual basis, income increased by just 1.7 percent.

Meanwhile, consumer price index data released two weeks from now could show a jump in prices of as much as 2.6 percent year-over-year, according to an estimate from the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ.

"Higher gas and food prices are being reflected in headline inflation and we have seen the end of growth in real earnings for some time," said Ellen Beeson Zentner, Senior U.S. Macro Economist at the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi, in a note after the report release.

Bizarro Earth

The Japan Nuclear Crisis And The Environment

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What in the world is going on over in Japan? The Japan nuclear crisis seems to get worse with each passing day. Right now environmental activists all over the world are beginning to have grave concerns about the lasting damage to the environment that is going to be caused by all of this radiation. Sadly, this crisis has already become worse than Chernobyl. Chernobyl was a nightmare, but it only burned for 10 days. The authorities in Japan are telling us that the nuclear crisis at Fukushima could go on for "weeks" or "months". There is no telling just how many millions of people will have serious health problems as a result of all this. Meanwhile, many environmentalists are seriously proposing that we should build more nuclear plants as a way to "save the environment". It is as if people simply cannot learn.

Now the Japanese authorities are telling us that 11,500 tons of "moderately radioactive" water is going to be purposely released into the Pacific Ocean.

Are they nuts?

Have they completely lost their minds?

Arrow Down

The Japanese Economy Is In Much Bigger Trouble Than Most People Think

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Now that nearly a month has gone by since the horrific tsunami in Japan on March 11th, it is starting to become clear just how much economic damage has been done. The truth is that the Japanese economy is in much bigger trouble than most people think. This is almost certainly going to be the most expensive disaster in Japanese history. The tsunami that struck Japan on March 11th swept up to 6 miles inland, destroying virtually everything in the way. Thousands upon thousands of Japanese were killed and entire cities were wiped off the map. Yes, Japan is a resilient nation, but exactly how does a nation that is already drowning in debt replace dozens of cities and towns that are suddenly gone? The truth is that thousands of square miles have been more completely destroyed than if they had been bombed by a foreign military force. The loss of homes, cars, businesses and personal wealth is almost unimaginable. It is going to take many years to rebuild the roads, bridges, rail systems, ports, power lines and water systems that were lost. Nobody is quite sure when the rolling blackouts are going to end, and nobody is quite sure when all of the damaged manufacturing facilities are going to be fully brought back online.

On top of everything else, the nuclear crisis at Fukushima never seems to end. In fact, it seems to get worse with each passing day.

According to the Los Angeles Times, it has now been announced that seawater off the coast of Japan near the Fukushima facility was recently found to contain 7.5 million times the legal limit of radioactive iodine....
The operator of Japan's stricken Fukushima nuclear plant said Tuesday that it had found radioactive iodine at 7.5 million times the legal limit in a seawater sample taken near the facility, and government officials imposed a new health limit for radioactivity in fish.

Cow Skull

Inside report from Fukushima nuclear reactor evacuation zone

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Fukushima, Japan - The Japanese government has issued the evacuation order on March 12 for the residents living within the 20 kilometer radius of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

Since then, residents have left their homes, and the "no man land" has been out of touch with the rest of the world.

A Japanese journalist, Tetsuo Jimbo, ventured through the evacuation zone last Sunday, and filed the following video report.

He says that, inside the evacuation zone, homes,building, roads and bridges, which were torn down by Tsunami, are left completely untouched, and the herd of cattle and pet dogs, left behind by the owners, wonders around the town while the radiation level remains far beyond legal limits.

Bulb

Germany to phase out nuclear power-deputy minister

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© Unknown
Ticking nuclear time bombs?
A German deputy environment minister said the government would phase out all nuclear power in the country before 2020, taking a hard line stance that may not be reflective of the centre-right coalition.

"A decision has been taken to shut down eight plants before the end of this year and they definitely won't be reactivated. And the remaining nine will be shut down by the end of the decade," Juergen Becker told Reuters on Monday.

"Japan has shown that even if there is a miniscule occurrence, the residual risk is too high to justify the continuation of nuclear power (...) It is better to go for other energy services in a civilised country," he said.

A phase out could cost the four big utility companies RWE RWG.DE, E.ON (EONGn.DE: Quote), EnBW (EBKG.DE: Quote) and Vattenfall [VATN.UL] hundreds of millions of euros in lost profits every year.

Pistol

Netherlands - Gunman Kills Six in Amsterdam Shooting

Amsterdam Shooting
© EPA
Policemen arrive at the shopping mall 'De Ridderhof' in Alphen aan den Rijn.

A lone gunman in the Netherlands killed six people after he stormed a shopping centre and opened fire with a machine gun.

Witnesses told how the man, in his mid 20s, began shooting people in the car park before walking calmly through the shopping centre, shooting his victims "in cold blood".

His victims included a woman in a motorised wheelchair, who was shot in the head. A number of children had been shot, but it was unclear whether they were among the dead.

"I saw a woman I know walking at the other side. She wanted to enter a shop when a tall young man approached and shot her in cold blood. He walked calmly and shot through the windows of the shop where I was hiding," said Marjolein Nieuwland.

"I also saw a woman in her motorised wheelchair shot in the head, and at the Albert Heijn (grocery store) there was a young man. Also dead. Later I heard that was the shooter."

The gunman, who was known to local police, later turned a gun on himself. Ten others were wounded in the attack on the Ridderhof mall in the town of Alphen aan den Rijn, 13 miles southwest of Amsterdam.