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Mon, 26 Oct 2020
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Attention

The ten worst Covid data failures

local lockdown sign
© Getty
Throughout the pandemic, the government and its scientific advisers have made constant predictions, projections and illustrations regarding the behaviour of Covid-19. Their figures are never revisited as the Covid narrative unfolds, which means we are not given an idea of the error margin. A look back at the figures issued shows that the track record, eventually validated against the facts, is abysmal. This is important because major decisions continue to be taken on the strength of such data. There have been several noteworthy failings so far.

1)Overstating of the number of people who are going to die

This starts with the now-infamous Imperial College London (ICL) 'Report 9' that modelled 500,000 deaths if no action was taken at all, and 250,000 deaths if restrictions were not tightened. This set the train of lockdown restrictions in motion. Some argue that Imperial's modelling may have come true had it not been for lockdown. But this does not explain Sweden. Academics there said its assumptions would mean 85,000 deaths if Sweden did not lock down. It did not - and deaths are just under 6,000.

2) Leaked SAGE papers

Next came a print paper written by SAGE members to support a two-week 'circuit breaker', leaked to the press. The reports were striking.
"'With no social distancing measures in place from now until January, the virus could potentially spiral out of control and kill 217,000 people, hospitalise 316,000 and infect 20.7 million. But with a strict two-week lockdown the number of deaths could be reduced by 100,000, admissions by 139,000 and infections by 6 million.'

Comment: If exact data were available, it would further support the case that Covid is not a deadly disease and all these measures taken have nothing to do with 'protecting public health'.


Red Pill

Yes, coronavirus poses a risk - but our response to it is not intelligent or useful. Britain is infected... by a bad case of madness

empty shelves

They create the idea that we are in the midst of a terrifying plague that will kill us all, when the truth – though disturbing – is far less frightening. Their worst effect is to savage the economy by scaring people away from normal activities. Empty shelves are pictured above in an Asda store in London
Yes, you are right. We have gone quite mad. I know that many people are thinking this, but dare not say so. I will be accused of all kinds of terrible things for taking this view - but that is another aspect of how crazy things are.

Yes, coronavirus poses a risk. No, our response to it is not intelligent or useful. In fact, I think it is increasingly damaging and will soon become more so.

The key word here is proportion. There is nothing wrong with simple, practical precautions.

I have for many years believed that door handles pose one of the greatest threats to health, and try never to touch them with the naked hand. I was taught from my earliest years to wash my hands before eating.

I am a health faddist. I work at a standing desk. For many years I have walked and bicycled wherever I can.

Attention

NHS 'won't cope' if infection rate continues at current rate, scientist warns

Epidemiologist Neil Ferguson
© Reuters
Epidemiologist Neil Ferguson
The NHS won't be able to cope if coronavirus cases continue to rise at the current rate, the architect of the March lockdown has warned. Professor Neil Ferguson, whose modelling led to country being shut down in the spring, said that the Government may have no choice but to introduce even stricter measures unless case numbers begin to fall substantially. Speaking to the BBC Radio 4 Today programme, the influential scientist said while infections among 18 to 21-year-olds were falling, they were continuing to rise in other age groups. He said:
"Unfortunately, in every other age group case numbers continue to rise at about the same rate they were. There are little hints of slowing, for instance in the North East of England, but we are not seeing the sort of slowing that we really need to to get on top of this.

"It is a worrying situation. We now have 8,000 people in hospital with Covid. That is about a third of the level we were at the peak of the pandemic in March. If the rate of growth continues as it is, it means that in a month's time we will above that peak level in March and that is probably unsustainable. We are in a critical time right now. The health system will not be able to cope with this rate of growth for much longer."
Professor Ferguson's stark warning came after new figures released yesterday showed the second wave of infections may be beginning to slow.

Comment: Yes, we are infected but it is with lies and persuasions. That there is such a vast divide on concept, diagnosis, protocols and reasonable medical recourse highlights how opinions in the medical field overrule obvious scientific facts. Thus we have a diversity of highly questionable expertise that runs the gamut of ideologically-infested medical advice - a tower of babble.


Pistol

Aussie special forces allegedly executed hog-tied Afghan prisoner because of no space for him in helicopter

Australian soldiers
© Australian Defence Force
Australian special forces have been accused of killing an unarmed, bound prisoner in cold blood, as a four-year probe into alleged war crimes committed by Aussie troops in Afghanistan nears its end.

A US Marine helicopter crew chief told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) that a group of Australian soldiers shot and killed an Afghan prisoner as they were preparing to be airlifted after a raid. According to the marine, identified only as Josh, the Aussie commandos radioed his helicopter to tell them they needed transportation for seven prisoners captured during the operation. He told the Australian outlet:
"And you just heard this silence, and then we heard a pop. And then they said, 'OK, we have six prisoners'. We knew somebody was already cuffed up, ready to go, taken prisoner, and we just witnessed them kill a prisoner. It was a very deliberate decision to break the rules of war."
The US marine said it was the first time he had seen something he couldn't "morally justify," as the prisoner had already been detained and posed no threat to the Aussie forces.

Comment: As in the travesty of the Julian Assange case, another Aussie journalist may face charges for reporting inconvenient news.


Snakes in Suits

Woke Tech goes full Biden as Expensify warns 10 million customers that a vote for Trump may mean 'CIVIL WAR'

BrennerTrump
© Expensify/Reuters/Tom Brenner
Expensify CEO David Barrett • US President Donald Trump
The expense report processor Expensify is doing its best to scare its 10 million customers into voting for Democrat presidential candidate Joe Biden, saying anything less is "a vote against democracy" and may lead to "civil war."

David Barrett, CEO of the San Francisco-based company, said in an email blasted out to all of Expensify's customers on Thursday that the US is "facing an unprecedented attack on the foundations of democracy itself." Anyone who votes for President Donald Trump, votes for a third-party candidate, or doesn't cast a ballot is showing that they are "comfortable standing aside and allowing our democracy to be methodically dismantled, in plain sight," he added.

Barrett didn't detail how he thinks Trump is destroying democracy, saying only that he believes the president is trying to suppress votes. As a provider of expense-management software, he said, "Expensify depends on a functioning society and economy. Not many expense reports get filed during a civil war."

Barrett made no effort to reconcile his doomsday views on Trump with the fact that Expensify is able to rank as the world's most widely used and fastest-growing expense-management platform while the current president is in charge.

Mail

Democrat ballot harvesting in California backfiring spectacularly

Ballot drop
© AP/Elaine Thompson
It is perfectly legal in the State of California for Democrats to send campaign workers and volunteers door-to-door to collect absentee ballots and bring them to the clerk's office to be counted. Democrats have made an art form of ballot harvesting and credit their efforts with flipping 4 House seats in Orange County.

The individual harvesting the ballots doesn't have to identify himself or sign his name on each ballot. Some workers have handed in hundreds of absentee ballots they collected. Republicans were at a distinct disadvantage.

But then the California GOP started their own ballot harvesting efforts. They put absentee ballot drop boxes at gun ranges, churches, and GOP offices.

This was not what the Democrats had in mind at all. They only want to make it easier for Democrats to vote. So the Democratic secretary of state and the Democratic attorney general sent cease-and-desist letters to several local GOP chairmen telling them to stop because the drop boxes weren't "official."

Republicans gleefully told the Democratic officials to go hang.

Health

Are we really seeing a second wave?

Bronco busting the covid
© Spectator Australia
"Facts are stubborn things, but statistics are pliable." There are lots of sayings about statistics, but I think this one by Mark Twain best describes where we are at, regarding hospital figures and Covid-19.

There are three questions that currently need answering when it comes to the Covid debate: firstly, are we experiencing a second wave? Secondly, is the NHS under imminent threat either regionally or nationally from a rise in infections? And thirdly, will government restrictions actually help?

But the misunderstanding and unrepresentative use of admittedly complex data and statistics is rampant, and we are no closer to getting answers to these questions.

When it comes to the existence of a second wave, it is clear that positive case numbers are up. But there is next to no point comparing positive figures on a daily basis, because of delays in reporting, differences in numbers tested each day, and because of the biases introduced by the Test and Trace system - which by definition directs testing towards those most likely to return positive tests.

Bizarro Earth

Eating rats and snakes to survive: The brutal toll of Myanmar's second lockdown

myanmar lockdown
© AFP
A volunteer wearing personal protective equipment alongside an ambulance as Yangon residents are transferred to a quarantine centre.
After the first wave of coronavirus hit Myanmar in March, 36-year-old Ma Suu closed her salad stall and pawned her jewellery and gold to buy food to eat.

During the second wave, when the government issued a stay-home order in September for Yangon, Ma Suu shut her stall again and sold her clothes, plates and pots.

With nothing left to sell, her husband, an out of work construction labourer, has resorted to hunting for food in the open drains by the slum where they live on the outskirts of Myanmar's largest city.

"People are eating rats and snakes," Ma Suu said through tears. "Without an income, they need to eat like that to feed their children."

Comment: Isn't it curious that, as much of the planet sees what was left of their economies decimated by unjustified lockdowns, in comes the World Economic Forum with a plan for a global reset: From Lockdown to Police State: The 'Great Reset' Rolls Out

Also check out SOTT radio's:


Yellow Vest

BBC exodus: Britons overwhelm phone lines & website in rush to cancel TV licenses

BBC HQ
© Stefan Kiefer / Global Look Press
FILE PHOTO. Headquarters of the television and radio station BBC
It appears that so many people want to cancel their TV licenses in Britain that the BBC cannot cope with the outflow. However, some critics suggest the broadcaster is deliberately hampering the process.

"We have more calls than usual at the moment, and they are taking longer to answer as we operate in accordance with Covid-19 government guidelines," a spokesman for the BBC told the Express newspaper, when asked why its phone lines were clogged.

The BBC is the primary beneficiary of the British TV licensing scheme. Anyone who wishes to watch or record live television in the UK has to pay a £157.50 ($205) annual fee. And the tens of thousands of people who dodge it face prosecution and fines each year - and may even be sent to prison.


Comment: Note that one may never watch the BBC and yet one will be forced to pay for it if they have a television.


Comment: Any state backed media is likely to be as corrupt (or as reputable) as the government that organizes its funds. And so, as it is, the BBC has proven itself time and again to be as untrustworthy as the government it clearly represents.

These days people have much more choice as to where they can get their information and an increasing number of them are becoming wise to the the depths that the BBC will plunge to deceive the very people that fund it.

UK television household name Richard Madeley recently spoke out against the BBC and its blatantly biased reporting during the lockdowns.

For more on the deplorable state of the BBC, see:


Toys

More libtard lunacy: Slate says Mozart & Beethoven should be called by their full names to fight 'sexism and racism', Twitter baffled

Mozart & Beethoven

Mozart & Beethoven
Calling famous classical music composers just by their last names can be "harmful" nowadays, according to an article published in US liberal magazine Slate. The piece was instantly mocked online.

Writing for Slate, Chris White, an assistant professor of music theory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, took issue with how some composers, like Beethoven or Mozart, are often referred to just by their last names, while others are not. In fact, continuing to use such mononyms today could be seen as "outdated and harmful," he argued.

Comment: Slate takes bottom-feeding to a whole new (lower) level.