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Comet 2

Pilots film stunning trail of 'UFO' as they fly over Mexico: Pentagon says it's from a Trident missile launch

rocket mexico comet

Missile... or something else?
The crew of a passenger plane traveling to Mexico got a rare opportunity to witness a test-launch of a Trident nuclear missile as it flew over the Pacific Ocean. Unaware of what it was, they filmed the dramatic sight.

A beautiful streak of light that exploded outward into a wide beam of white light turned out to be a Trident missile. In the footage, the crew can be heard saying 'Wow,' as they look out at the shooting star beside their Airbus liner.

The video published by The Drive was shot from a plane flying from Guadalajara to Tijuana sometime in early September. It clearly shows two-stage separations as the missile launched from the Ohio-class submarine USS 'Nebraska' skips through the sky westward.


Comment: Hmmm...

We're skeptical.

Trident test-fires are usually solitary launches, and are sometimes fired in pairs. But four in quick succession?

And why did the Navy press release give a vague date range and landing location (where the missiles come down onto a target range) on this occasion? They usually specify when and where a missile was launched and came down.

Also, whoever sent that video to The Drive didn't include the time/date on which the pilots flew.

As the Drive article points out:
We don't know the distance of the aircraft to the missile, and of course, the aircraft's altitude and range from the missile is going to make a difference as to where it appears in the sky from the aircrew's perspective, but this looks too flat even taking those factors into account.
Now, we've reported on this kind of sighting many times over the last two decades, and they're typically connected with test-launches of missiles. What often happens though is that a missile launch is associated with the sighting/footage after the fact, and often very clumsily at that.

The RT article above says the video "clearly shows two-stage separation" of a missile, but there's nothing clear about it. The thing is, that 'separation' feature has been observed in similar videos that have been taken of objects that could not be tied down to a nearby missile launch.

What we're getting at is that these pilots may have witnessed something coming into the atmosphere, at a 'flat' angle, not leaving it...

For more on the similarities of missile and comet/meteor trails, check out:

Incoming! Meteor or Comet Fragment Explodes Above Southwestern US, Prompting US Army 'Missiles' Cover-up

Reading Celestial Intentions Through the Wrong End of the Telescope: Missiles, UFOs and the Cold War


Fireball

Meteor fireball lights up sky across California

Fireball over California
© Twitter/Courtesy of @AardwolfEssex
California residents took to social media Monday night to report a glowing fireball across the night sky over multiple cities including Sacramento, Lynwood and San Diego.

One social media user caught a video of the fireball shooting across the sky while he was driving. (See below)

​Although unclear, the object appears to fit the description of a fireball, which is a meteor that burns as brightly as the planet Venus in the morning or evening sky, according to the American Meteor Society.

According to several reports, the annual Draconid meteor shower is expected to generate around eight shooting stars every hour starting Tuesday.

Fireball 2

Bright meteor fireball flies over northeastern Portugal

Fireball over Portugal
© SMART project
On October 3, 2019, the SMART project captured yet another fireball; this time, it flew over northeastern Portugal:
The meteor was reportedly generated from a comet that hit the atmosphere at about 230,000 km/h. It began at an altitude of about 135 km over the northeast of Portugal, and ended at a height of around 96 km over southwest of that country.

On the same day, The American Meteor Society received 18 reports of a meteor over the Netherlands. The increasing number of fireballs reported on the planet doesn't bode well for humanity. See:

Fireball 5

Rare Daytime Sextantid meteor observed over Arizona

Daytime Sextantid over Arizona
This weekend, NASA's Network of All Sky Meteor Cameras captured a rare fireball--a "Daytime Sextantid." Here it is disintegrating over Arizona just before sunrise on Saturday, Oct. 5th:

Daytime Sextantids are so rarely seen that the American Meteor Society says "spotting any [Daytime Sextantid] activity would be a notable accomplishment." Consider it noted. NASA cameras on Kitt Peak, Mount Lemmon, and Mount Hopkins caught the fireball in mid-flight, allowing a solid triangulation of its orbit and identification as a Daytime Sextantid.

Daytime Sextantids are related to the Geminid meteors of December. Both belong to the "Phaethon-Geminid Complex"--a complicated swarm of debris that includes "rock comet" 3200 Phaethon along with asteroids 1999 YC and 2005 UD. The ensemble appears to be the remains of a giant breakup of ... something ... thousands of years ago.

Comment: Two separate meteor fireball events also took place over US skies on 5th October. Over one hundred reports were sent to the American Meteor Society (AMS) for each. 4849-2019 from Florida and the Carolinas and 4848-2019 from the Ohio area.


Fireball 2

Meteor fireball (or two) blazes over Ireland - Also seen from Scotland and Wales

meteor fireball ireland

The fireball as seen from Galway, Ireland. The phone-camera's lens is facing roughly north-northeast. The trajectory appears to be from west-northwest to east-southeast.
Another big meteor fireball was seen a couple of nights ago, at around 9pm on October 4th, this time over Ireland and western parts of the UK. In fact, we're not sure that it was one solitary object.

Here's footage of a fireball that was taken in Galway in the west of Ireland:


The American Meteor Society received 19 reports of a fireball over Ireland, Scotland and Wales. AMS member 'Paul K.', also based in Galway, captured this footage of the event:


Fireball 4

Meteor fireball seen soaring over São Paulo, Brazil

Fireball over Sao Paulo, Brazil
© AMS/Eduardo S.
On September 29, 2019, a meteor was captured by EXOSS as it flew over São Paulo, Brazil. The footage was uploaded to the American Meteor Society by 'Eduardo S':


Fireball

Bright flash from meteor fireball captured on home surveillance camera in Denham Springs, Louisiana

Bright flash from meteor in LA
© YouTube/J. Prestridge
On September 30, 2019, American Meteor Society member 'J. Prestridge' captured video of a bright flash of light attributed to a meteor on her home surveillance camera:


Fireball 5

Daytime fireball meteor explodes over Queensland emitting a deafening sonic boom

Queensland meteor fireball

The huge ball of fire was seen in the skies around 1.30pm on Tuesday in areas across Far North Queensland (pictured)
An incredibly rare 'daytime fireball' meteor exploded in the sky above Far North Queensland on Tuesday.

The 'very bright flash of light' was seen in the skies around 1.30pm spanning hundreds of kilometres around Cairns.

It was followed by a sonic boom which left some locals wondering if there had been an earthquake.

David Reneke who has been an astronomer for 50 years told Daily Mail Australia it was extremely rare to ever witness this type of meteor.

'To see one in the daytime is quite a unique event, they're quite rare,' Mr Reneke said.


Comment: Other meteor fireballs observed over Australia recently include:

Meteor fireball caught on camera flying across southern Victoria, Australia (26th Sept. 2019)

'Fireball' meteor lights up skies over Tasmania and Victoria (21st Sept. 2019)


Mr Reneke said the meteors burn through the sky before becoming so hot that they explode.

'These meteors come through the sky and they burn and they melt. When they melt they give off nice bright colours and a sonic boom associated.'

'They get so hot they actually explode.'

He said it was hard to see as it was over in a matter of seconds.

Fireball 4

Stunning meteor fireball filmed exploding over the Mediterranean Sea

Fireball over Mediterranean Sea`
© YouTube/Meteors
The SMART project captured footage of an 'amazing meteor' as it soared over the Mediterranean Sea on September 25, 2019:
It was generated by a rock from a comet that hit the atmosphere at about 140,000 km/h. It began at an altitude of about 108 km over the sea, and ended at a height of around 60 km.


Fireball 5

Bright meteor fireball flies over the north of Spain

Fireball over N. Spain
© YouTube/Meteors
On September 27, 2019, the SMART projected recorded a bright meteor as it flew over the provinces of Segovia, Valladolid and Zamora, Spain:
This fireball flew over the provinces of Segovia, Valladolid and Zamora on the night of September 27, at 22:40 local time.

A rock from an asteroid at a speed of about 111 thousand kilometers per hour came into the earth's atmosphere. The ball of fire advanced westward to end south of the province of Zamora.