People injured during an earthquake receive medical treatment in a hospital parking lot in Cianjur, West Java, Indonesia (
© AP
People injured during an earthquake receive medical treatment in a hospital parking lot in Cianjur, West Java, Indonesia
At least 46 people have died and hundreds left injured after a 5.6-magnitude earthquake shook Indonesia's main island of Java on Monday.

The head of the country's disaster agency BNPB said up to 700 have been injured from the earthquake.

Earlier, a government official, Herman Suherman, said at least 300 were injured from the earthquake and said this figure was from just one hospital.

He pointed out that there were four hospitals in the area, in comments that indicate the casualties and those injured from the earthquake could rise.

The national disaster agency had earlier reported 14 deaths.



The magnitude 5.6 quake, centered in the Cianjur region in West Java province at a depth of 10km (6.2 miles), damaged dozens of buildings and sent residents into the capital's streets for safety.

The quake was felt strongly in the greater Jakarta area. Some buildings in the national capital swayed, while some had to be evacuated, reported the Associated Press.

Shaking of several seconds was also felt in surrounding West Java areas like Sukabumi, Bogor and Bandung, reported The Straits Times.

Footage from the local Metro TV showed some buildings in Cianjur reduced to rubble and concerned residents crowding outside.

Dozens of buildings, including an Islamic boarding school and hospital, were damaged in the quake.

"The quake felt so strong. My colleagues and I decided to get out of our office on the ninth floor using the emergency stairs," Vidi Primadhania, an employee in South Jakarta, was quoted as saying by the Associated Press.

At least 25 aftershocks were recorded in the aftermath of the earthquake, according to the country's weather and geophysics agency, known as BMKG.

Data on casualties and damage was still being collected, the National Disaster Mitigation Agency said in a statement.

Indonesia lies on the Pacific "Ring of Fire", which makes the country with a population of 270 million prone to quakes, volcanic eruptions and tsunamis.

It is, however, uncommon for earthquakes to be felt in Jakarta.