ertugrul
We've all seen them: Hollywood superhero blockbusters where the protagonist is a two-dimensional cardboard cutout, a shallow reflection of what makes a real hero a model of inspiration to begin with. All too reliant on presenting a spectacle to dazzle the eyes and the ears, these productions bombard us with imagery, ideas, and mediocre writing - in lieu of a fully drawn character who embodies the virtues, behavior and soul of the archetypal hero. Quite often we don't know what we've been missing in these portrayals until we see one that satisfies on multiple levels. So when we come across such a champion as we have in the Turkish television show Dirilis: Ertugrul (Resurrection: Ertugrul), you know we're going to celebrate it.

In this week's MindMatters we discuss why the epic Resurrection: Ertugrul is not only one of the most successful foreign television shows ever made - but how its protagonist, 13th-century Turkish tribal leader Ertugrul, may be taken as a hero for people of all faiths. Wildly popular in the Muslim world, you don't need to be a Muslim to appreciate or enjoy this mythologized re-telling of the legends surrounding his life. Ertugrul embodies all the traits of a real hero: honor, integrity, justice, intelligence, devotion, compassion, mercy, humility, and overall epic badassery. The show itself portrays traditional values, spiritual realities, universal problems, individual and group strengths and weaknesses - and the ever-present cosmic battle of good and evil. At a time when truly good heroic stories are in short supply we look at why this 'non-Western' story fits the job description that we are looking for in works of fiction.


Running Time: 01:22:06

Download: MP3 — 75.2 MB


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