Mueller ambushed MSNBC
© MSNBC
Russiagate-obsessed news network MSNBC sent one of its journalists to talk to the one person in a position to feed the dying hopes that the now-public Mueller report still holds the key to ousting President Donald Trump.

MSNBC's Mike Viqueira ambushed Robert Mueller as he and his wife were leaving St. John's Episcopal Church in downtown Washington after an Easter service. In what he probably believed to be an act of adversarial journalism, Viqueira pelted the special counsel with questions to which every Russiagater hopes to hear the right answers.


"Will you testify before the Congress, sir? If it were anybody but the president, would Mr Trump be indicted, sir? Sir, why didn't you make a recommendation to the Congress one way or the other? Did the attorney general accurately characterize your positions on conspiracy and obstruction, sir?"

Mueller responded with "no comment." But Viqueira simply wouldn't take that for an answer. Speaking to anchor Alex Witt in the studio about the encounter, he later joked that Mueller was "tight-lipped" with him.

Many commenters on Twitter didn't find it as amusing as he did though. "Bad form to harass him on Easter Sunday guys!" one person said. "MSNBC stalked and harassed [Mueller]," another commenter remarked. The general message to the network seems to be: Leave the man alone, he deserves a break after digging into Trump for two years.






US politicians and media personalities, who were hoping that Mueller's report would be the downfall of Donald Trump's presidency, are grasping at straws after the 400-page document stated that Trump's campaign didn't collude with Russia and refrained from saying if it was involved in any obstruction of justice. AG William Barr decided negatively on the latter, since there was no underlying crime to cover up in the first place.

Now the people who were feeding their audience the collusion narrative for over two years are resorting to new tactics, like accusing Barr of maliciously misleading the public to protect the president, implying that the redacted parts of the publicly available report are still hiding some smoking gun, or claiming that the Mueller investigation was too narrow to begin with.