Fireball - stock image

Fireball - stock image
The first reports of Monday night's bright fireball came in between 9 PM and 9:30 PM CST, and it turns out it was high in the atmosphere over South Carolina a little west of Greenville.

Dr. Bill Cooke from NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center captured it on several cameras and tells us this:
'Last night at 9:57 PM Eastern Standard Time (8:57 PM Central), eyewitnesses in the southeastern United States reported seeing a bright meteor, which was also observed by 4 NASA all sky meteor cameras in the region.

The video data enable us to establish that the fireball was first spotted 55 miles above the Oconee Nuclear Station at the south end of Lake Keowee in South Carolina, traveling north of west at 56,000 miles per hour. It completely ablated 17 miles above the Nantahala Woodland Lodge in the mountains of North Carolina. At its brightest, the fireball was as bright as the crescent Moon, indicating it was caused by an asteroidal fragment 3 inches in diameter and weighing roughly one pound. '

Here's the ground path and a still image taken from the Chickamauga, Georgia.

More from NASA on fireballs and the network of cameras are accessible here: NASA.