organ trafficking
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A newspaper article suggests that Algerian children are kidnapped, trafficked to Morocco where they are sold to Israelis or American Jews for the sake of organ harvest
An international Jewish conspiracy to kidnap children and harvest their organs is gathering momentum as another shocking story divulges Israeli plot to harvest organs from Algerian children.

The story, published in the Arabic-language Algerian daily al-Khabar, charges that Interpol, the international police organization, has revealed the existence of 'a Jewish gang' that was 'involved in the abduction of children from Algeria and trafficking of their organs.'

According to the story, bands of Moroccans and Algerians had been roaming the streets of Algerian cities in an attempt to hunt for young children. They then trafficked the kids across the border into neighboring Morocco.

The children were then sold to Israelis and American Jews in Oujda, the capital of eastern Morocco, for the purpose of organ harvesting in Israel and the United States.

The story is based on statements made by Mustafa Khayatti, head of the Algerian National Committee for the Development of Health Research. Khayatti maintains that the abduction of children in Algeria is linked to arrests made in New York and New Jersey at the end of July, in which several Jewish men were arrested in connection with an investigation into illegal organ trafficking and political corruption.

The story comes in line with the article published last month in Aftonbladet, Sweden's largest circulation daily, suggesting that the Israeli army kidnapped and killed young Palestinians to harvest their organs. It shed light on the case of Bilal Ahmed Ghanem, a 19-year-old Palestinian man, who was shot dead in 1992 by Israeli forces in the West Bank village of Imatin.

Bostrom, who witnessed the man's killing, said Ghanem's body was abducted following the shooting and was returned at midnight -- during an imposed curfew -- several days later by the Israeli military with a cut from the stomach to the neck that had been stitched up.

Bostrom argued that an autopsy would be required if the cause of death was not apparent, while in this case it was clear that Bilal was shot dead.

After that incident, at least 20 Palestinian families told Bostrom that they suspected the Israeli military had taken the organs of their sons after they had been killed by Israeli forces and their bodies had been taken away.