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Unconventional Research


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Low carb ketogenic diet can combat cancer because cancer is a metabolic disease

Dr. Dominic
© Examiner.com
Cancer scientist Dr. Dominic D'Agostino.
For years, cancer was considered a genetic disorder, but emerging evidence suggests that cancer is a metabolic disease that can be prevented and managed with the low-carb, high-fat ketogenic diet.

According to cancer researcher Dr. Dominic D'Agostino, the ketogenic diet, in conjunction with ketone supplementation, can significantly reduce the spread of cancer, and may prevent the onset of cancer by improving metabolic health.

"Most cancer scientists have historically thought cancer was a genetic disease, but only 5-10% of cancer is hereditary," Dr. D'Agostino told me in an exclusive interview Friday.

D'Agostino is an assistant professor at the University Of South Florida Morsani College Of Medicine in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology.

According to D'Agostino, we are only as healthy as our mitochondria, which are the power sources of all our cells, so if we keep our mitochondria healthy, we can stall the onset of age-related chronic diseases. A review describing the metabolic theory of cancer was recently published by Professor Thomas Seyfried from Boston College in collaboration with D'Agostino's lab in the medical journal Carcinogenesis.
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New images from space appear to show Loch Ness monster is 'alive'

Loch Ness_3
© Express
Fresh sightings of the Loch Ness monster from space.
Amazing new images taken from space appear to show something swimming below the surface of the world's most famous loch.

There had been fears that Nessie could have died after more than a year without a verified sighting.

But today's fresh pictures have again peaked the excitement of Nessie enthusiasts everywhere - especially after experts ruled out the possibility it is a sunken ship.

The images were captured by two different amateur hunters scanning different satellites transmitting images of the earth from space - Peter Thain of Newbiggin by the Sea, Northumberland and Andy Dixon from Darlington, County Durham.

The creature was spotted just outside the village of Dores, on the south shore of Loch Ness.

The images were beamed from Apple's satellite map app and could only be viewed on some ipads and iphones.
Airplane

Wichita's mystery in the sky

Mystery Plane
© KSN.com
Kansas - Jeff Templin is a amateur photographer. He says he's seen it all until now. While taking pictures of wildlife back in February, something caught his eye. He said it looked like an unusual contrail.

"Right over the city, clear as a bell," said Templin. "Anyone that was looking up would have seen it. You don't usually see military or even civilian aircraft's jets that leave contrails making those kind of severe departures off of the given route."

Templin says the aircraft made several; severe 180 degree turns in the sky in the shape of an "S", even more unusual.

"Absolutely silent, no sound," he said.

So he snapped a few photos and took it home.

"When I put it on my computer and processed them, I was surprised to see this triangular shape that is not like anything you typically see," he said.

Templin says he's a big fan of air planes, so there was no doubt what he saw wasn't....we'll you know.

"It was one of ours or at least man made for sure, so unidentified yes, but alien, no," he said.

We reached out to several aviation experts, including McConnell. The base told us they were unable to identify the aircraft. They did say it could be a B-2 Bomber, but couldn't confirm it. And if it was, it wasn't one of theirs.

There are several theories out there on the internet of what the object could be, but for now the aircraft in the sky remains a mystery.
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How personality increases risk of drug abuse

Alcohol Bottles
© Shutterstock
People with certain personality traits may be at increased risk for drug use problems, and studying personality may help researchers better understand and treat these problems, according to a new review.

Many studies have attempted to link genes to the condition researchers call substance use disorder, but they've largely failed to do so, even though the condition can run in families, said Dr. Sergi Ferré, a senior scientist and section chief at the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

That may be because the connection between genes and substance use is not straightforward, and personality traits may serve as a bridge between the two, Ferré said.

Personality traits have already been linked with the risk of having substance use disorder, and with certain circuits in the brain.

"We should [have] many more studies trying to connect those personality traits and genes," Ferré said. "They will allow us to get better clues about the genetic and other factors that predispose to SUD," Ferré said, referring to substance use disorder.

Once researchers understand, from a brain perspective, why people develop drug use problems, they may be able to develop drug treatments that reverse these effects, the researchers said.
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Not everyone needs probiotics, suggests study of hunter-gatherer guts

Probiotics
© Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology
Gut response. These Hadza women have different gut bacteria than Hadza men, probably because they eat a lot of high-fiber tuberous root vegetables.
After taking an antibiotic or catching an intestinal bug, many of us belt down probiotic drinks to restore the "natural balance" of organisms in our intestines. Probiotics are one of the fastest growing products in the food industry, now added to yogurts, drinks, and baby food. Yet, not everyone needs them to stay healthy. A new study of the gut bacteria of hunter-gatherers in Africa has found that they completely lack a bacterium that is a key ingredient in most probiotic foods and considered healthy. What's more, the Hadza don't suffer from colon cancer, colitis, Crohn's, or other diseases of the colon that are found in humans eating modern diets in Western nations.

The new study is the first to report on the gut bacteria of hunter-gatherers, who hunt and forage for most of their foods, just as our ancestors did before the invention of agriculture 10,000 years ago. Until now, studies of gut bacteria have focused on people who live in industrialized nations, many of whom eat diets high in sugar, salt, and fat. These diets have shifted the type of bacteria in our guts, known as the microbiome. Gut bacteria respond rapidly to changes in their host's diet, and humans who live in rural areas and eat fewer processed foods have more diverse microbiomes. Conversely, researchers also have found an association between less diversity in the microbiome and diseases of the colon, such as Crohn's disease and colon cancer.
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Trauma can be inherited from parents

Trauma
© Alamy
When people go through a traumatic experience it affects their cells and that change can be passed on to their children.
Traumatic experiences can be inherited, as major shocks alter how cells in the body work and that change can be passed on to children, scientists have claimed.

Psychologists have known for some time that trauma can cause behavioural disorders, such as depression, which can be passed down from one generation to the next.

"There are diseases such as bipolar disorder, that run in families but can't be traced back to a particular gene", said Prof Isabelle Mansuy at the University of Zurich.

Now researchers have found that exposure to high levels of stress alters the production of 'microRNA' molecules, which help regulate genes.

And they were found to be present in sperm, suggesting that they could be passed on to future generations.

Mice exposed to high levels of stress were seen to exhibit depressive symptoms and their metabolism slowed down.

Those behavioural symptoms were also seen in their offspring even though the mice were not exposed to any traumatic stress themselves. The changes were ever found in third generation mice.
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Archaeologists' findings may prove Rome a century older than thought

Rome
© WestEnd61/Rex
Rome may be older than its official birthday of 21 April 753BC when founded by Romulus and Remus.
It is already known as the eternal city, and if new archaeological findings prove correct Rome may turn out to be even more ancient than believed until now.

Next week, the city will celebrate its official, 2,767th birthday. According to a tradition going back to classic times, the brothers Romulus and Remus founded the city on 21 April in the year 753BC.

But on Sunday it was reported that evidence of infrastructure building had been found, dating from more than 100 years earlier. The daily Il Messagero quoted Patrizia Fortini, the archaeologist responsible for the Forum, as saying that a wall constructed well before the city's traditional founding date had been unearthed.
Question

Is Saturn making a new moon?

Saturn New Moon?
© NASA
A 750-mile (1,200-km) -long feature spotted on Saturn’s A ring by Cassini on April 15, 2013.
Congratulations! It's a baby... moon? A bright clump spotted orbiting Saturn at the outermost edge of its A ring may be a brand new moon in the process of being born, according to research recently published in the journal Icarus.

"We have not seen anything like this before," said Carl Murray of Queen Mary University in London, lead author of the paper. "We may be looking at the act of birth, where this object is just leaving the rings and heading off to be a moon in its own right."

In images acquired with Cassini's narrow-angle camera in 2013, a 1,200-kilometer-long, 10-kilometer-wide arc of icy material was observed traveling along the edge of the A ring. The arc is thought to be the result of gravitational perturbations caused by an as-yet unseen embedded object about a kilometer wide - possibly a miniature moon in the process of formation.
Heart

Artificial blood 'will be manufactured in factories'

Artificial Bllod
© Alamy

Production of blood on an industrial scale could become a reality,
It is the stuff of gothic science fiction: men in white coats in factories of blood and bones.

But the production of blood on an industrial scale could become a reality once a trial is conducted in which artificial blood made from human stem cells is tested in patients for the first time.

It is the latest breakthrough in scientists' efforts to re-engineer the body, which have already resulted in the likes of 3d-printed bones and bionic limbs.

Marc Turner, the principal researcher in the £5 million programme funded by the Wellcome Trust, told The Telegraph that his team had made red blood cells fit for clinical transfusion.

Prof Turner has devised a technique to culture red blood cells from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells - cells that have been taken from humans and 'rewound' into stem cells. Biochemical conditions similar to those in the human body are then recreated to induce the iPS cells to mature into red blood cells - of the rare universal blood type O.

"Although similar research has been conducted elsewhere, this is the first time anybody has manufactured blood to the appropriate quality and safety standards for transfusion into a human being," said Prof Turner.
Question

'Cherry tree from space' mystery baffles Japan

Cherry Pips
© South China Morning Post
The cherry pips on board the space station.
Tokyo - A cosmic mystery is uniting monks and scientists in Japan after a tree grown from a cherry stone that orbited the Earth for eight months bloomed years earlier than expected -- and with very surprising flowers.

The four-year-old sapling -- grown from a cherry pit that spent time onboard the International Space Station (ISS) -- burst into blossom on April 1, possibly a full six years ahead of Mother Nature's normal schedule.

Its early blooming turned on its head the received wisdom of the Buddhist brothers at the ancient temple in central Japan where the tree is growing. "We are amazed to see how fast it has grown," Masahiro Kajita, chief priest at the Ganjoji temple in Gifu, told AFP by telephone.

"A stone from the original tree had never sprouted before. We are very happy because it will succeed the old tree, which is said to be 1,250 years old."

The wonder pip was among 265 harvested from the celebrated Chujo-hime-seigan-zakura tree, selected as part of a project to gather seeds from different kinds of cherry trees at 14 locations across Japan.

The stones were sent to the ISS in November 2008 and came back to Earth in July the following year with Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata after circling the globe 4,100 times.
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