Topic
Plagues
Map


Blackbox

Which one is accurate? Multiple computer models are predicting Ebola deaths

zombie
© unknown
We could potentially be on the verge of the greatest health crisis that any of us have ever seen. The number of Ebola cases in Africa has approximately doubled over the past three weeks, and scientific computer models tell us that this Ebola pandemic could ultimately end up killing millions of us - especially if it starts spreading on other continents. At first, many assumed that this Ebola outbreak would be just like all the others - that it would flare up for a little while and then it would completely fade away. But that has not happened this time. Instead, this epidemic has seemed to pick up momentum with each passing week. Despite extraordinary precautions, hundreds of health workers have gotten the virus, and the head of the CDC says that the spread of Ebola is "spiraling out of control" and that it is "going to get worse in the very near future." For those that have thought that all of this talk about Ebola was just "fearmongering", it is time for you to wake up.

Comment: For more on ways to prepare see:

Pestilence, the Great Plague, and the Tobacco Cure

Natural treatments for Ebola virus exist, research suggests

Natural allopathic treatment modalities for Ebola virus

And of course there is the matter of strengthening the immune system through adopting a Ketogenic Diet.

Health

Number of Chikungunya cases in El Salvador tops 16,000, Virgin Islands declare epidemic, 113 dead total in the Americas

chikungunya
At least 16,000 patients have contracted the chikungunya virus in El Salvador, prompting health officials in the Central American country to step up the fight Monday to eliminate disease-carrying mosquitoes. "Of the 16,000 chikungunya cases, 11,000 are in the department of San Salvador," where the capital is located, Health Minister Violeta Menjívar said during a press conference. Menjívar said the country remains on "national alert," which was declared last June for both the chikungunya virus and dengue, both transmitted by mosquitoes. She said officials would "intensify the response," including stepping up fumigation efforts and national awareness campaigns aimed at reminding residents to eliminate stagnant water. "We are calling for the unification of efforts by government agencies, municipalities and the Education Ministry [for a campaign] in schools," the minister said. Chikungunya fever is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, and causes a sudden high fever, skin rashes, pounding headaches, nausea and muscle pain.

Comment: All the following articles are from the past June and July and it seems that the epidemic is getting worst:

More in New York, New Jersey infected with chikungunya virus: CDC

Mosquito-borne virus Chikungunya found in Kentucky; 9 possible cases

Puerto Rico declares epidemic of mosquito-borne virus chikungunya; 200 confirmed cases

Florida residents infected with chikungunya virus from domestic mosquitos

Incurable mosquito-borne chikungunya virus now found in six US states

Ambulance

Infectious disease experts concerned about Ebola mutating and becoming airborne

Monrovia woman ebola

A woman in Monrovia carries the belongings of her husband, who died after he was infected by the Ebola virus.
Today, the Ebola virus spreads only through direct contact with bodily fluids, such as blood and vomit. But some of the nation's top infectious disease experts worry that this deadly virus could mutate and be transmitted just by a cough or a sneeze.

"It's the single greatest concern I've ever had in my 40-year public health career," said Dr. Michael Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota."I can't imagine anything in my career -- and this includes HIV -- that would be more devastating to the world than a respiratory transmissible Ebola virus."

Osterholm and other experts couldn't think of another virus that has made the transition from non-airborne to airborne in humans. They say the chances are relatively small that Ebola will make thatjump. But as the virus spreads, they warned, the likelihood increases.


Comment: There is some evidence that Ebola has already become airborne. The fact is, a number of health workers and researchers who have not had any direct contact with Ebola victims, have themselves become infected.


Every time a new person gets Ebola, the virus gets another chance to mutate and develop new capabilities. Osterholm calls it "genetic roulette."

As of Friday, there have been 4,784 cases of Ebola, with 2,400 deaths, according to the World Health Organization, which says the virus is spreading at a much faster rate now than it was earlier in the outbreak.

Comment: Ebola is certainly out of control in western Africa and the rest of the world is in great peril. For a better understanding of this global threat see:

Attention

Virologist expects 5M dead as Ebola threatens to destroy Sierra Leone and Liberia

Ebola patient
© www.liberianobserver.com
Liberian nurses tend one of a thousand patients with Ebola.
The killer virus is spreading like wildfire, Liberia's defense minister said on Tuesday as he pleaded for UN assistance. A German Ebola expert tells DW the virus must "burn itself out" in that part of the world.

His statement might alarm many people.

But Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit of the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine in Hamburg told DW that he and his colleagues are losing hope for Sierra Leone and Liberia, two of the countries worst hit by the recent Ebola epidemic.

"The right time to get this epidemic under control in these countries has been missed," he said. That time was May and June. "Now it is too late."Schmidt-Chanasit expects the virus will "burn itself out" in this part of the world.

With other words: It will more or less infect everybody and half of the population - in total about five million people - could die.

Stop the virus from spilling over to other countries

Schmidt-Chanasit knows that it is a hard thing to say. He stresses that he doesn't want international help to stop. Quite the contrary: He demands "massive help." For Sierra Leone and Liberia, though, he thinks "it is far from reality to bring enough help there to get a grip on the epidemic."

According to the virologist, the most important thing to do now is to prevent the virus from spreading to other countries, "and to help where it is still possible, in Nigeria and Senegal for example." Moreover, much more money has to be put into evaluating suitable vaccines, he added.

Comment: While previous outbreaks have been largely confined to rural areas, the current epidemic, the largest ever, has reached densely populated, impoverished cities - including Monrovia, the capital of Liberia - gravely complicating efforts to control the spread of the disease. Unlike Senegal, which has closed its border to Guinea because of the outbreak, Liberia has no plans to do so and has stated that they are not legally allowed to do so by international treaty. It is estimated that the country will require approximately $1.2 million dollars in order to properly educate its citizens, treat the virus, isolate those who contract it, and work to contain the deadly outbreak. Perhaps in this instance, breaking the international treaty would have been a good safety measure. Mr. Schmidt-Chanasit has made a bold statement. Let's hope he is erring to the high side, but prepare for the worst. So far, humanity is not winning this war...exponentially.

Ambulance

Liberia bracing for upsurge in Ebola cases as WHO predicts exponential increase in infections across West Africa

ebola liberia
Liberia is bracing for an upsurge in Ebola cases, following a grim World Health Organization assessment on Tuesday that the worst is yet to come in the fight against the killer virus.

While the WHO predicted an "exponential increase" in infections across West Africa, it warned that Liberia, which has reaped the lion's share of misery with half of all fatalities, could initially only hope to slow contagion, not stop it.

The UN's health arm upped the Ebola death toll Tuesday in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria to 2,288 out of 4,269 cases, noting nearly half of all infections had occurred in the past 21 days.

The WHO also evacuated its second infected medical expert, a doctor had been working at an Ebola treatment centre in Sierra Leone.

Emory University Hospital in Georgia on Tuesday admitted an American who had contracted Ebola in West Africa, but the hospital has declined to confirm it was the WHO employee.
Alarm Clock

Sierra Leone to impose three-day quarantine in effort to contain Ebola outbreak

ebola
© AFP, Wikipedia
As African governments struggle to contain the ongoing Ebola outbreak, Sierra Leone has announced it will enforce a three-day quarantine across the country to "deal with Ebola once and for all" as one government official put it.

Ibrahim Ben Kargbo, a presidential adviser on the country's Ebola task force, told The Guardian that the planned quarantine, between Sept. 19 and Sept. 21, will allow health workers to isolate new cases of the disease and keep it from spreading.

During those three days, 7,000 teams of health workers will go door to door to find people who are suffering from the disease but have not reported it to authorities. Spokesman for the Sierra Leone government, Abdulai Bayraytay, said the quarantine will be enforced by the military and police.

"It's clear that we have pockets of resistance, in terms of denial," Bayraytay told The New York Times. "People are still harboring loved ones at home."

He added that neighbors are calling local authorities and giving away information about people rumored to have contracted the disease.

"That gave us the clear indication that people are still harboring patients," he said.

But some health organizations, like Doctors Without Borders, say that enforced quarantines and lockdowns will only drive those reluctant to report illnesses even deeper into hiding. Quarantines, some argue, are too punitive in nature and don't work in encouraging people to seek help.

"It has been our experience that lockdowns and quarantines do not help control Ebola, as they end up driving people underground and jeopardizing the trust between people and health providers," Doctors Without Borders said in a statement over the weekend.
Ambulance

UK to join America in sending military, humanitarian personnel to fight Ebola outbreak

© Reuters / 2Tango
Health workers wearing protective clothing prepare to carry an abandoned dead body presenting with Ebola symptoms at Duwala market in Monrovia August 17, 2014
Britain has announced it will send military and humanitarian experts to Sierra Leone to set up medical treatment centers in areas affected by the Ebola outbreak.

A 62-bed facility will be built and operated by military engineers and medical staff. The medical center will become operational within 8 weeks. The health facility is in addition to the UK's 25 million pound package of support to contain and control the disease. This includes multilateral support as well as direct funding to aid agencies operating on the ground, the official press release by the UK government said on Monday.

Comment: The Ebola outbreak is spiraling out of control. For more information, check out:

Attention

Ebola spread exponential, thousands of cases expected in September

The Ebola virus is spreading exponentially in Liberia, where many thousands of new cases are expected over the coming three weeks, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday. In a statement, the WHO said that motorbike-taxis and regular taxis are "a hot source of potential virus transmission" in Liberia where conventional Ebola control interventions "are not having an adequate impact." The United Nations agency said that aid partners need to scale-up current efforts against Ebola by three-to-four fold in Liberia and elsewhere in West Africa. In Liberia it had killed 1,089 people among 1,871 cases, according to the WHO's update of last Friday.

U.S. Military to be deployed


The US military will join the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, President Barack Obama said, warning it will be months before the epidemic slows. Mr. Obama said that in its current form, he did not believe Ebola would reach the United States, but warned the virus could mutate and become a much greater threat to those outside Africa.

Comment: It looks like the Black Death has returned:

-Black Death found to be Ebola-like virus
-Finally catching up - Could the Black Death actually have been an Ebola-like virus?
-It finally reaches mainstream: Researchers argue 'Black Death' was due to Ebola, not Bubonic plague
-New Light on the Black Death: The Cosmic Connection
-New Light on the Black Death: The Viral and Cosmic Connection

Related:

Happy New Year 2014?

SOTT Talk Radio show #70: Earth changes in an electric universe: Is climate change really man-made?

Health

Ebola's return to locations that had beaten it back is proof the outbreak has spun out of control

© AP
In this photo taken on Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014, a health worker, left, uses a thermometer to screen a man at a makeshift road block run by Guinean security forces outside the town of Forecariah, Guinea
Doctors Without Borders shuttered one of its Ebola treatment centers in Guinea in May. They thought the deadly virus was being contained there.

The Macenta region, right on the Liberian border, had been one of the first places where the outbreak surfaced, but they hadn't seen a new case for weeks. So they packed up, leaving a handful of staff on stand-by. The outbreak was showing signs of slowing elsewhere as well.

Instead, new cases appeared across the border in Liberia and then spread across West Africa, carried by the sick and dying. Now, months later, Macenta is once again a hotspot.

The resurgence of the disease in a place where doctors thought they had it beat shows how history's largest Ebola outbreak has spun out of control.

It began with people leaving homes in Liberia to seek better care or reunite with families back in Guinea, a pattern repeating itself all over.

"Currently in Guinea, all the new cases, all the new epidemic, are linked to people that are coming back from Liberia or from Sierra Leone," said Marc Poncin, the emergency coordinator for Doctors Without Borders in Guinea.

The epidemic also has touched Nigeria and Senegal while killing more than 2,000 people across West Africa. Never before has the disease struck such a densely populated region, where so many people are on the move. For four decades, the virus struck in relatively remote areas, where doctors could quickly isolate communities and stop its spread.

Comment: It's certainly looking like Ebola is is going out of control and medical authorities are not going to be able to handle its wrath:

Ambulance

Unidentified respiratory virus hit more than 1000 children across 10 US states, likely to spread across country

A respiratory illness that has already sickened more than a thousand children in 10 states is likely to become a nationwide problem, doctors say.

The disease hasn't been officially identified but officials suspect a rare respiratory virus called human enterovirus 68. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the virus is related to the rhinovirus, which causes the common cold.

The disease hasn't been officially identified in every state, but in some states a rare respiratory virus called human enterovirus 68 has been found. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the virus is related to the rhinovirus, which causes the common cold.

According to Mark Pallansch, director of the Division of Viral Diseases at the CDC, similar cases to the ones in Colorado have been cropping up across the U.S. At least 10 states -- Missouri, Kansas, Illinois, Kentucky, Iowa, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Carolina, and Georgia -- have reported suspected outbreaks of human enterovirus 68 and requested CDC support.
Top