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Bacon n Eggs

Mainstream psychiatrists getting up to speed with new research linking diet and mental health

meat
© unknown
Jodi Corbitt had been battling depression for decades and by 2010 had resigned herself to taking antidepressant medication for the rest of her life. Then she decided to start a dietary experiment.

To lose weight, the 47-year-old Catonsville, Md., mother stopped eating gluten, a protein found in wheat and related grains. Within a month she had shed several pounds - and her lifelong depression.

"It was like a veil lifted and I could see life more clearly," she recalled. "It changed everything."

Corbitt had stumbled into an area that scientists have recently begun to investigate: whether food can have as powerful an impact on the mind as it does on the body.

Comment: For more of the benefits of the ketogenic diet see:

The Ketogenic Diet - An Overview

Beyond weight loss: a review of the therapeutic uses of very-low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets

The fat-fueled brain: unnatural or advantageous?

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Survey: Half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory

© ASheepnomore.net
About half of American adults believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory, according to new survey results.

Some conspiracy theories have much more traction than others, however.

For example, three times as many people believe U.S. regulators prevent people from getting natural cures as believe that a U.S. spy agency infected a large number of African Americans with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

J. Eric Oliver, the study's lead author from University of Chicago, said people may believe in conspiracy theories because they're easier to understand than complex medical information.

"Science in general - medicine in particular - is complicated and cognitively challenging because you have to carry around a lot of uncertainty," Oliver said.

Comment:
Those who believe in medical conspiracies and actually question the junk science of modern medicine have facts and reasons that support their views:

Nigeria launches seven billion dollar case against Pfizer
Almost 800 adverse reactions to swine flu vaccine identified
New Scientific Data Forces Government to Reverse Its Stance on Fluoride in the Water Supply
New GMO Food Additives To Be Introduced Without Full Safety Appraisal
Doctor Psychopath: Anatomy of a tragedy
Top ten actual medical conspiracies
The cholesterol - heart disease scam: How the medical-industrial complex is raking in billions at our expense
Scientists fail to find a link between saturated fat and heart disease
Plants Bite Back: The Surprising, All-Natural Anti-Nutrients and Toxins in Plant Foods

Attention

Canada: suspected Ebola in returning traveler

Health officials in Guinea battled to contain west Africa's first outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus as neighbouring Liberia reported its first suspected victims and a traveller returning to Canada was hospitalised with suspicious symptoms.
© AFP Photo/Cynthia Goldsmith
An electron micrograph image of an Ebola virus virion obtained March 24, 2014 from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia
At least 59 people are known to have died in Guinea's southern forests and there are six suspected cases in Liberia which, if confirmed, would mark the first spread of the highly contagious pathogen into another country.

And there are fears the virus may have crossed continents, with a man returning to Canada from Liberia seriously ill in hospital after experiencing symptoms consistent with the virus, health officials said.

"As of this morning six cases have been reported of which five have already died -- four female adults and one male child. One of the suspected cases, a female child, is under treatment," Liberian Health Minister Walter Gwenigale said in a statement.
Health

Guinea Ebola outbreak thought to have spread to Liberia

© AFP Photo/P.Déré/V.Lefai
Map locating towns hit by Guinea's Ebola outbreak
Aid workers and health officials in Guinea battled Monday to contain west Africa's first outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus as neighbouring Liberia reported its first suspected victims.

At least 59 people are known to have died in Guinea's southern forests but the Liberian cases, if confirmed, would mark the first spread of the highly contagious pathogen into another country.

"As of this morning six cases have been reported of which five have already died -- four female adults and one male child. One of the suspected cases, a female child, is under treatment," Liberian Health Minister Walter Gwenigale said in a statement.

"The team is already investigating the situation, tracing contacts, collecting blood samples and sensitising local health authorities on the disease," he added.

Gwenigale did not specify the victims' nationalities, but Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said they were Liberian residents who had attended funerals in the Ebola-hit area of Guinea, which has strong "family ties" with northern Liberia.

"People come to attend funerals on one side and unfortunately they unwittingly get infected and then return home," Brussels-based MSF emergency coordinator Marie-Christine Ferir told AFP.
Health

Rashes from wipes, liquid soaps on the rise

Rash
© iStockphoto.com / Tracy Hebden
Allergic skin reactions to a preservative used in pre-moistened wipes and liquid soaps are on the increase, a doctor says.

"In the last two or three years, we've suddenly seen a big increase in people with this type of allergy," Dr. Matthew Zirwas, director of the contact dermatitis center at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center, said in a center news release. "For some patients, their rash has been unexplained and going on for years."

The chemical preservative, methylisothiazolinone, is found in many water-based products, including pre-moistened wipes, cosmetics, liquid soaps, hair products, sunscreen, and laundry and cleaning products.
Pills

Vascular surgeon: Why I've ditched statins for good

As experts clash over proposals that millions more of us take statins to prevent heart disease and stroke, a vascular surgeon explains why he feels better without them.

Dr Haroun Gajraj: 'After looking more closely at the research, I’d concluded that statins were not going to save me from a heart attack and that my cholesterol levels were all but irrelevant.
When I had a routine health check-up eight years ago, my cholesterol was so high that the laboratory thought there had been a mistake. I had 9.3 millimoles of cholesterol in every litre of blood - almost twice the recommended maximum.

It was quite a shock. The GP instantly prescribed statins, the cholesterol-lowering drugs that are supposed to prevent heart disease and strokes. For eight years, I faithfully popped my 20mg atorvastatin pills, without side effects. Then, one day last May, I stopped. It wasn't a snap decision; after looking more closely at the research, I'd concluded that statins were not going to save me from a heart attack and that my cholesterol levels were all but irrelevant.

Comment: Vascular surgeons write a damning report about lowering cholesterol drugs:

The statin industry is the utmost medical tragedy of all times.

See also:

- No reason at all to limit saturated fat in the diet according to the largest most comprehensive review
- From the Heart: Saturated fat is not the major issue
- Consequences of replacing saturated fats with carbohydrates or Ω-6 polyunsaturated fats: The dietary guidelines have it wrong

Arrow Down

Young mother in coma after routine dental surgery

Kristen
© United Press International, Inc
A young mother is comatose after a routine dental procedure.

Kristen Tavares, 23, was put on life support after going into cardiac arrest during a wisdom teeth removal Monday. The reason for her reaction is unknown.

She was flown to a hospital in Maui where her family members say she is unresponsive and her heart rate too faint for any kind of procedure.

Tavares has a 4-year-old son and gave birth to her second child 3 months ago.

The dentist, Dr. John Stover, has had 4 formal complaints filed against him. Two have been resolved and two are still pending.

Two months ago, 3-year-old Finley Boyle died after a month long coma following a routine dental procedure in Hawaii.
Ambulance

Scientists reveal how cancer tricks the body

Cell
© Thinkstock
A team of Australian scientists believe they have discovered how cancer cells hoodwink the body's immune system into thinking they are harmless.

"This could lead to new treatments for aggressive advanced cancer and other diseases", says lead investigator Professor Mark Smyth.

The crux of the discovery is an improved understanding of how protective white blood cells, known as natural killer cells, discriminate between harmless cells and disease.

"It tells us something that we did not know before. It also has implications for viruses," says Prof Smyth, of the QIMR Berghofer Research Institute in Queensland.

"Essentially it shows how cancer hijacks the system of immune recognition and activation, allowing the cancer to spread through the body."
Syringe

Dr. Suzanne Humphries, practicing nephrologist, on the safety and efficacy of vaccines

© Unknown
Dr Suzanne Humphries, a practicing nephrologist (kidney physician) says the vaccine industry isn't giving people both sides of the story, and parents need to get informed before subjecting their children to vaccines that can potentially cause serious harm or even death.
Info

Update: Guinea Ebola outbreak reaches 59, disease may have spread to Sierra Leone

© AFP Photo / Florence Panoussian
Health workers, dressed in head-to-toe "Ebola suits", leaving in a pick-up truck in Uige, about 300km north of the Angolan capital, Luanda, to collect a man dying from haemorrhagic fever.
Local experts had not been able to identify the disease, the symptoms of which are diarrhea, vomiting and bleeding, since they were first identified some six weeks ago. However, lab samples were sent to scientists in the French city of Lyon, who confirmed that it was Ebola.

The Guinean health ministry said 49 cases of the disease had been indentified so far with 34 deaths in four prefectures.

"We are overwhelmed in the field, we are fighting against this epidemic with all the means we have at our disposal with the help of our partners but it is difficult. But we will get there," said the Guinean Health Ministry's chief disease prevention officer, Sakobo Keita.

Medical aid group Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said it would send reinforcements to help its teams of 24 doctors, nurses and health experts already in Guinea. The organization has set up isolation units in the southern region of Nzerekore and it is searching for people who may have had contact with infected individuals.

MSF also said it was sending some 33 metric tons of medicines, as well as isolation, sanitation and protective equipment.

Comment: Update: Ebola outbreak confirmed in Guinea, death toll reaches 59

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