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A 'stiff upper lip' is killing British men

fine
© Vice / Dan Evans
It's a hereditary condition - men raised by men unable to communicate emotionally, the symptoms of what we now know as PTSD becoming synonymous with masculinity. This is wildly fucked up when you stop to consider it.

A traumatic event in one's childhood is capable of inspiring exactly three things: shitty debut novels, self-absorbed blog posts, and dark jokes that make your friends feel weird around you. Case in point, the last conversation I had with my father, who'd been off work with the flu for a couple of weeks.

"How are you feeling, dad?" I asked.

"Better," he replied. Then he stood up and made his way to the bathroom to die.

A big part of me hopes that, vision fading and lips turning blue, my dad's final thought before submitting to the cold grip of extinction was a gleeful, Haha, I got you, you little shit. If that final word really was the last in his lifetime of unwavering sarcasm, it was - for my money - the single greatest burn I've ever heard.

Three weeks later, I celebrated my tenth birthday. A few months after that, I took home the title of "funniest pupil" in a classroom awards ceremony. Deflecting my grief into something that made others laugh felt much better than breaking down crying several times a day - which, in reality, was what I wanted (and probably) needed to do. People latch onto any kind of positivity after something so painful, and I guess I found validation in the laughter of my peers. Plus, let's face it, no one wants to be the kid constantly crying about their dead dad. That guy is always a total fucking buzzkill.

When the coroner was finished rooting around inside the vessel that had, for 51 years, housed my one-time Mensa member father (he was too tight to renew his subscription after the first year), a fatal heart attack was recorded, and off went dad to his fiery conclusion in the Loughborough crematorium. But the post-mortem also revealed significant scar tissue indicative of a previous attack sometime in the months or years previously. That was news to us all. Apparently, near-fatal chest pains weren't something that he deemed worthy of professional consultation. Classic dad!
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Experts questioned the validity of Ebola testing way back in 1977

lab
© photopin cc
The experts were expressing grave doubts all the way back in 1977. Right at the beginning.

They were questioning the validity of standard tests used to diagnose Ebola - tests being the only way to say the virus is present in humans.

Of course, if the tests are unreliable, the whole premise of an epidemic caused by a single virus has no value. It's an unwarranted assumption.

At that point, you can look for illness and death stemming from a number of causes. And you're driven to the fact that, in Africa, large numbers of people have been dying for a very long time, for reasons that have nothing to do with germs:

Grinding poverty, war, starvation and severe malnutrition, contaminated water, pesticides, lack of basic sanitation, extreme overcrowding, stolen farm land, toxic medicines, and so on.

Not a viral epidemic.
Health

Cold sores increase risk of dementia


Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease, researchers claim.
Infection with herpes simplex virus increases the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, claim this in two studies in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia.

"Our results clearly show that there is a link between infections of herpes simplex virus and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. This also means that we have new opportunities to develop treatment forms to stop the disease," says Hugo Lövheim, associate professor at the Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Geriatric Medicine, Umeå University, who is one of the researchers behind the study.

Alzheimer's disease is the most common among the dementia diseases. In recent years research has increasingly indicated that there is a possible connection between infection with a common herpes virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, and Alzheimer's disease. A majority of the population carries this virus. After the first infection the body carries the virus throughout your lifetime, and it can reactivate now and then and cause typical mouth ulcer. The hypothesis which links the herpes virus and Alzheimer's disease is based on that a weakened immune system among the elderly creates opportunities for the virus to spread further to the brain. There this can in turn start the process which results in Alzheimer's disease.

Comment: Some helpful articles on Alzheimer's disease:

Food for thought: Eat your way to dementia - sugar and carbs cause Alzheimer's Disease

Ketogenic Diet Reduces Symptoms of Alzheimer's

The Ketogenic Diet - An Overview

Ketogenic Diet (high-fat, low-carb) Has Neuroprotective and Disease-modifying Effects

Health

Sport in old age can stimulate brain fitness, but effect decreases with advancing age

© DZNE
Neuroscientists studied older adults exercising on the treadmill.
Physical exercise in old age can improve brain perfusion as well as certain memory skills. This is the finding of Magdeburg neuroscientists who studied men and women aged between 60 and 77. In younger individuals regular training on a treadmill tended to improve cerebral blood flow and visual memory. However, trial participants who were older than 70 years of age tended to show no benefit of exercise. Thus, the study also indicates that the benefits of exercise may be limited by advancing age. Researchers of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the University of Magdeburg and the Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology have published these results in the current edition of the journal Molecular Psychiatry. Scientists at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and the Max Planck Institute for Human Development were also involved in the study.

The 40 test volunteers were healthy for their age, sedentary when the study commenced and divided into two groups. About half of the study participants exercised regularly on a treadmill for 3 months. The other individuals merely performed muscle relaxation sessions. In 7 out of 9 members of the exercise group who were not more than 70 years old, the training improved physical fitness and also tended to increase perfusion in the hippocampus -- an area of the brain which is important for memory function. The increased perfusion was accompanied by improved visual memory: at the end of the study, these individuals found it easier to memorize abstract images than at the beginning of the training program. These effects were largely absent in older volunteers who participated in the workout as well as in the members of the control group.

The study included extensive tests of the volunteers' physical condition and memory. Furthermore, the study participants were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This technique enables detailed insights into the interior of the brain.
Health

New study charts the fate of chemicals affecting health, environment


The trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health has been recently studied through a meta-analysis of 143,000 peer-reviewed research papers. The work tracks the progress of these chemicals of emerging concern, revealing patters of emergence from obscurity to peak concern and eventual decline, over a span of 30 years.
Looking forward in science often requires looking back, evaluating trends to extrapolate future outcomes. A classic case is Moore's Law, which predicts that the density of components on an integrated circuit will double every 24 months. The estimate has helped guide many developments in the computer industry.

In a new study, Rolf Halden, PhD, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, examines the trajectory of chemicals appearing as emergent threats to human or environmental health.

Halden's meta-analysis of 143,000 peer-reviewed research papers tracks the progress of these chemicals of emerging concern or CECs, revealing patters of emergence from obscurity to peak concern and eventual decline, over a span of 30 years.

The study reveals that around 14 years typically elapse from the onset of initial safety concerns about a given chemical to the height of concern and appropriate action. This extended timeline implies protracted exposure to CECs for a large number of people.

The research results appear in the current issue of the Journal of Hazardous Materials.

"To better protect human health and the environment, it is desirable to decrease both the number of CECs entering commerce and the time required to take action," says the study's author.

Halden is the director of Biodesign's Center for Environmental Security, whose primary focus is "to protect human health and critical ecosystems by detecting, minimizing and ultimately eliminating harmful chemical and biological agents through early detection and engineering interventions."

In past research, his group has evaluated a broad range of common chemicals and assessed their human and environmental impact, including antimicrobial chemicals in personal care products, plastics (and chemicals involved in their fabrication), tobacco, brominated flame retardants and fluorinated synthetic chemicals on prenatal and postnatal health.
Health

Beating Ebola? Spanish nurse appears to be healed from deadly virus

© Reuters / Juan Medina
Two ambulances arrive at Madrid's Carlos III Hospital.
The Spanish nurse who contracted the Ebola virus while treating infected patients at a Madrid hospital has seemingly beaten the disease following a complex treatment, the country's government said.

Teresa Romero, 44, was the first person to become infected with Ebola outside of West Africa earlier in October. She was hospitalized with a high fever and moved to an isolation unit at a hospital in central Madrid.

New tests revealed a negative result for the virus, according to a statement released by the Spanish government on Sunday.

The patient's treatments included a drip of human serum with antibodies from Ebola sufferers who had survived the disease, as well as other drugs which were not named.

One of the unnamed drugs was reportedly the experimental anti-viral medicine favipiravir, El Mundo newspaper reported.
Newspaper

NYT Reporter defends gov't Ebola response - our new Lapdog Czar?

© DN Photo/Bobby Ellis
Rukmini Callimachi
@rcallimachi Would you please quit calling it Ebola panic? It's really Ebola awareness. Awareness that we're being told lies by govt.
- Cory (@bdcory) October 20, 2014
President Obama can count on many in the mainstream media to have his back when it comes to offering a defense of his administration's actions (or inactions). Include New York Times Foreign Correspondent Rukmini Callimachi among this administration's staunch defenders when it comes to the issue of Ebola:
@bdcory who has returned from Liberia 22 days ago not hysteria? And finally how is kicking a woman in an airplane toilet not craziness?
- Rukmini Callimachi (@rcallimachi) October 20, 2014
@rcallimachi How is this govt to be trusted?
- Cory (@bdcory) October 20, 2014
@bdcory What have they done to lose your trust? The incompetence of a hospital in Dallas is not equivalent to our government
- Rukmini Callimachi (@rcallimachi) October 20, 2014
Does the Obama administration have a "Lapdog Czar" yet?
Video

Vaccination Nation: Interview with Barbara Loe Fisher

"Right now, what's on the line in this country is whether or not we're going to have the legal right in the future to make choices about federally recommended vaccines." -Barbara Loe Fisher

On this edition of Real Politik James speaks with Barbara Loe Fisher, president and co-founder of the National Vaccine Information Center, a non-profit charity established in 1982. For the past three decades, she has led a national, grassroots movement and public information campaign to institute vaccine safety reforms and informed consent protections in the public health system.

Loe Fisher has researched, analyzed and publicly articulated the major issues involving the science, policy, law, ethics and politics of vaccination to become one of the world's leading consumer advocacy experts on the subject. NVIC is not "anti-vaccine," as mainstream news media might encourage the public to believe. Rather, it is pro-safe vaccines and exists to ensure the informed consent of the parents and patients who chose to vaccinate.

Comment: Barbara Loe Fisher, a pioneer in vaccine education and safety, and the founder of the National Vaccine Information Center (NVIC), shares important information about calling the Department of Human Health Services to task on vaccine over sight, policies and laws. She very clearly points out the obvious conflicts of interest between big pharma aka drug companies and DHHS vaccination enforcement policies:

Question

Stress: A new trigger of Alzheimer's?

The connections between stress and physical and mental health are undeniable. Studies have found links between acute and/or chronic stress and a wide variety of health issues.

This includes reduced immune function, increased inflammation, high blood pressure, and alterations in your brain chemistry, blood sugar levels and hormonal balance, just to name a few.

According to recent research, stress also appears to be related to onset of Alzheimer's disease, which currently afflicts about 5.4 million Americans, including one in eight people aged 65 and over.1

It is projected that Alzheimer's will affect one in four Americans in the next 20 years, rivaling the current prevalence of obesity and diabetes. There is still no known cure for this devastating disease, and very few treatments. Alzheimer's drugs are often of little to no benefit, which underscores the importance of prevention throughout your lifetime.

Fortunately, there's compelling research showing that your brain has great plasticity and capacity for regeneration, which you control through your diet and lifestyle choices.
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Vaccine Injury: The critical role of Microflora

There are gaping holes in vaccine science, especially the critical role of microflora in mediating vaccine effects, including adverse ones.
The purpose of these articles is to call attention to gaping holes in vaccine science, issues never before studied:
  1. How childhood vaccines may affect flora balance and colonization, and
  2. How existing flora (microbial predisposition) may affect vaccine response leading to injury.
In Part 1, we explored microbes as the underlying beauty of diversity in explaining how children react differently to vaccines. It's known gut dysbiosis contributes to inflammation and poor vaccine response. This means imbalanced flora leads to vaccine failure. Children born with imbalanced flora may be prone to powerful vaccine reaction of the immune system leading to injury. Important microbes such as protective Bifidobacteria may be reduced or absent.

Some groups with microbial predisposition based on ancestral dietary habits may be predisposed to vaccine reaction and higher risk of injury. How childhood vaccines affect flora balance, short and long-term, remains unknown. And there are no studies about how the infant microbiome may predispose a child to vaccine injury.

Comment: Learn more about how diet can effect the intricate balance of gut flora composition: 'The gut-brain connection is a two-way street where what happens in the gut may lead to an inflammatory reaction in the brain'

Read more about the amazing connection between the brain, heart and gut minds: The best approach to balance gut flora is by dietary changes and nutritional supplements like probiotics. For more information, please visit the diet and health forum.

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