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2 deaths, 25 infected with MERS respiratory virus in South Korea; almost 700 in isolation

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© Reuters/Jim Young
Two people have reportedly died from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in South Korea, becoming the first lethal cases in the current outbreak. At least 682 people, who had come into contact with those infected with MERS virus, were previously isolated.

A 58-year-old woman, who passed away on Monday, became South Korea's first fatality related to the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome after testing positive for the virus, the Health Ministry said.

The female, whose identity has been withheld, was listed as a suspected case after coming into contact with the country's first MERS patient, a 71-year-old male, who also died.

The health authorities announced six more cases of the virus on Tuesday, bringing the number of afflicted people to 25.

The new cases included South Korea's first tertiary infections, as two of the patients had contracted the virus from a secondarily-infected patient, the ministry added.

At least 682 people, who had contact with these patients, both family members and medical staff who treated them, are in isolation in their homes or in quarantine facilities to prevent the spread of the disease, Health Ministry official Kwon Jun-wook told reporters.

South Korean President Park Geun-Hye has slammed health officials for their "insufficient" response to the virus outbreak.

"The initial response to MERS... was insufficient," Park said, calling to increase government efforts to prevent any further spread of the virus.

Comment: See also: SOTT EXCLUSIVE: Beware of hype - Second case of MERS virus confirmed in the U.S.


Info

Lack of restorative sleep keeps brain from clearing toxic beta-amyloid proteins believed to trigger Alzheimer's disease

© Bryce Mander and Matthew Walker
Heavy deposits of the toxic protein, beta-amyloid, shown in red in the brain on the right, are linked to poor sleep and may be paving the way for Alzheimer’s disease. A brain benefiting from deep sleep brain waves and an absence of beta-amyloid is shown on the left.
Sleep may be a missing piece in the Alzheimer's disease puzzle.

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have found compelling evidence that poor sleep -- particularly a deficit of the deep, restorative slumber needed to hit the save button on memories -- is a channel through which the beta-amyloid protein believed to trigger Alzheimer's disease attacks the brain's long-term memory.

"Our findings reveal a new pathway through which Alzheimer's disease may cause memory decline later in life," said UC Berkeley neuroscience professor Matthew Walker, senior author of the study to be published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

Excessive deposits of beta-amyloid are key suspects in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease, a virulent form of dementia caused by the gradual death of brain cells. An unprecedented wave of aging baby boomers is expected to make Alzheimer's disease, which has been diagnosed in more than 40 million people, one of the world's fastest-growing and most debilitating public health concerns.

The good news about the findings, Walker said, is that poor sleep is potentially treatable and can be enhanced through exercise, behavioral therapy and even electrical stimulation that amplifies brain waves during sleep, a technology that has been used successfully in young adults to increase their overnight memory.

"This discovery offers hope," he said. "Sleep could be a novel therapeutic target for fighting back against memory impairment in older adults and even those with dementia."

Comment: Studies increasingly show that lack of adequate sleep harms the brain and the body in numerous ways. Fortunately there are techniques that can help you conquer insomnia:


Health

Missing link found between brain, immune system -- with major disease implications

  • Vessels directly connecting brain, lymphatic system exist despite decades of doctrine that they don't
  • Finding may have substantial implications for major neurological diseases
  • Game-changing discovery opens new areas of research, transforms existing ones
  • Major gap in understanding of the human body revealed
  • 'They'll have to change the textbooks'
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© University of Virginia Health System
Maps of the lymphatic system: old (left) and updated to reflect UVA's discovery.
In a stunning discovery that overturns decades of textbook teaching, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the brain is directly connected to the immune system by vessels previously thought not to exist. That such vessels could have escaped detection when the lymphatic system has been so thoroughly mapped throughout the body is surprising on its own, but the true significance of the discovery lies in the effects it could have on the study and treatment of neurological diseases ranging from autism to Alzheimer's disease to multiple sclerosis.

"Instead of asking, 'How do we study the immune response of the brain?' 'Why do multiple sclerosis patients have the immune attacks?' now we can approach this mechanistically. Because the brain is like every other tissue connected to the peripheral immune system through meningeal lymphatic vessels," said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, professor in the UVA Department of Neuroscience and director of UVA's Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG). "It changes entirely the way we perceive the neuro-immune interaction. We always perceived it before as something esoteric that can't be studied. But now we can ask mechanistic questions."

"We believe that for every neurological disease that has an immune component to it, these vessels may play a major role," Kipnis said. "Hard to imagine that these vessels would not be involved in a [neurological] disease with an immune component."

Pineapple

Researchers confirm fructose causes more weight gain, physical inactivity and body fat deposition than glucose

In the last 40 years, fructose, a simple carbohydrate derived from fruit and vegetables, has been on the increase in American diets. Because of the addition of high-fructose corn syrup to many soft drinks and processed baked goods, fructose currently accounts for 10 percent of caloric intake for U.S. citizens. Male adolescents are the top fructose consumers, deriving between 15 to 23 percent of their calories from fructose--three to four times more than the maximum levels recommended by the American Heart Association.

A recent study at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois found that, matched calorie for calorie with the simple sugar glucose, fructose causes significant weight gain, physical inactivity, and body fat deposition.

The paper, "Fructose decreases physical activity and increases body fat without affecting hippocampal neurogenesis and learning relative to an isocaloric glucose diet," was published in Scientific Reports.

"The link between increases in sugar intake, particularly fructose, and the rising obesity epidemic has been debated for many years with no clear conclusions," said Catarina Rendeiro, a postdoctoral research affiliate at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology and lead author on the study. "The reality is that people are not only consuming more fructose through their diets, but also consuming more calories in general.

Comment: High fructose corn syrup is so prevalent in packaged foodstuffs, that it is becoming difficult to avoid because it is found in so many unexpected foods such as snack nuts, sauces and dressings and even tonic water to name just a few. Recently, manufacturers have changed their labels to read 'fructose' instead of 'high-fructose corn syrup' to hide the fact, but don't be fooled, it's exactly the same and still just as toxic.


Bacon

Study finds eating bacon could extend your lifespan

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© Flickr/cookbookman17
Bacon-lovers, you're in luck: a new study from researchers at ETH Zurich has revealed that niacin (aka Vitamin B3) could help you live longer! The niacin-rich food menu includes not only bacon, but also Marmite, sun-dried tomatoes, paprika, and peanuts; so, this pretty much sounds like the most delicious recipe for long life ever.

Energy Metabolism Prof Michael Ristow and his team decided to feed roundworms a bunch of niacin, and discovered that the new element in the worms' diet saw them living one-tenth longer than their Vitamin B3-free peers. This evidence is surprising to the science community, because niacin promotes the formation of "free radicals," which have long been theorized to actually cause aging in organisms.

Ristow's findings go against the largely accepted theory that food rich in antioxidants can prevent aging by eliminating free radicals. "The claim that intake of antioxidants, especially in tablet form, promotes any aspect of human health lacks scientific support," said Ristow. Instead, the Zurich scientists posits that "[c]ells can cope well with oxidative stress and neutralise it."

Basically, Ristow is suggesting that niacin is perfect for every couch potato who hates fruit. "Niacin tricks the body into believing that it is exercising - even when this is not the case," said Ristow. Next up for Ristow's team is testing the theory on mice.

So, for now, just know that pretty much everything you eat either does or does not cause aging. Perfect!

2 + 2 = 4

Why your grandparents didn't have food allergies...but you do

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Did your grandparents have food allergies? Mine sure didn't. A stark comparison to the growing epidemic of food allergies, worsening with every generation.

So why didn't your grandparents have food allergies? It's really quite simple...

Red Flag

Medical terrorism: Judges demand answers after children die in controversial cancer vaccine trial in India

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Unaware: Aman Dhawan (pictured), 16, is one of many youngsters who took part in the trial without being aware they had been signed up to test Merck's new Gardasil 9 drug, aimed at preventing cervical cancer
Judges in India's Supreme Court have demanded answers after children died during a controversial cervical cancer vaccine trial.

Young tribal girls received shots of pharmaceutical company Merck's Gardasil vaccine and Cervarix, manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline.

The vaccines are given to girls as young as nine in many countries - including the UK and the US - to protect against the human papilloma virus, one of the major causes of cervical cancer.

But the Indian court yesterday heard a challenge by campaigners who claim the study - funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation - failed to obtain the informed consent of the children or their parents.

They say that a 'study' carried out for the foundation by a US organisation was in fact an illegal drugs trial.

Comment: As the vaccine controversy heats up and rages on in the good old U S of A, psychopathic big pharma corporations like Merck and GSK continue their medical terrorism in third world countries where they hope their 'mad science' will go unnoticed and unpunished. Read more about the serious side affects of Gardasil:


Syringe

Member of mainstream press finally publishes truth about life-altering vaccine damages

© Unkown
Finally it's happened! A member of the mainstream press has the intestinal fortitude to publish the carefully 'kept secret', secret about vaccines and vaccinations: They cause dramatic life-altering damage and more frequently than "evidence-based medicine" or "consensus science" owns up to or MDs, the medical profession, public health agencies and pro-vaccine acolytes acknowledge.

The UK's Independent Newspaper published some extremely damning vaccine adverse drug reaction (ADR) information on May 31, 2015 that said:
In the 10 years to April this year the agency received almost 22,000 "spontaneous suspected" adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports in 13 routine immunisation categories including flu, MMR, tetanus, diphtheria and polio, according to a Freedom of Information response released earlier this month. [1]
However, the vaccine 'ante' has just been upped on vaccines' adverse events/damages according to the Freedom of Information (FOI) documentation dated May 14, 2015, according to the chart below.

Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency FOI Response 14 May 2015

Sherlock

How to tell if a medical study is complete bull

© Crypto Junod Info
Every single day, our news feeds are inundated with studies. We're told that certain foods are bad for our health, only to find a new study that indicates these foods are good for us, and vice versa. There's always some new report that claims the things we do everyday are giving us cancer, and there are just as many reports that claim to have a possible cure.

We read about them, we quote them, and we criticize them. Just about everything we believe in, is confirmed or denied by the studies that are cranked out by the scientific community on a daily basis.

But how many of them are true?

Comment: Flawed medical research may be ruining your health
"Oftentimes, medical journals or pharmaceutical companies that sponsor research will report only "positive" results, leaving out the non-findings or negative findings where a new drug or procedure may have proved more harmful than helpful." In other words, the truth is hidden.
Avoid having the wool pulled over your eyes. Protect the health of you and your family by doing your own research.


Health

Chronic illness begins in the gut

Good overall health begins with a healthy gut. Chronic illness begins with breakdown in the gut. This is where I typically start with clients looking to address any health challenge.
If you're looking for lasting improvement in any area of your health, it's best not to think of your body parts as being independent compartments. Every cell communicates with every other cell, not always directly, but via the fluids, hormones, and neurotransmitters that travel through the vast network of blood vessels and nerves that course through every part of you. And it all starts with your gut.

Comment: For more on gut health listen to this episode of Sott's Health and Wellness Show.