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Syringe

NIH Director blames 'budget cuts' for lack of an Ebola vaccine

Francis Collins
© NIH
Francis Collins
The head of the National Institute of Health (NIH) is blaming budget cuts for the current Ebola epidemic, claiming that a vaccine would have developed if the NIH's budget hadn't been stagnant for the past decade, the Huffington Post reports. Dr. Francis Collins told the Post that the "NIH has been working on Ebola vaccines since 2001. It's not like we suddenly woke up and thought, 'Oh my gosh, we should have something ready here.'"

When asked why his organization didn't have "something ready," he replied, "frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would've gone through clinical trials and would have been ready."

Instead, as the Ebola epidemic spreads, the NIH and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) must focus on developing a therapeutic regimen - like the Canadian-developed ZMapp - to treat individuals only after they are infected. Collins said that even the therapeutic route is problematic at this time, as it will be extremely difficult to produce an adequate supply of the experimental antibody cocktail by December.
Magic Wand

Moderate levels of 'free radicals' found beneficial to healing wounds

© Suhong Xu, UC San Diego
Increased levels of free radicals were found to speed the healing of wounds in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans.
Long assumed to be destructive to tissues and cells, "free radicals" generated by the cell's mitochondria - the energy producing structures in the cell - are actually beneficial to healing wounds.

That's the conclusion of biologists at UC San Diego who discovered that "reactive oxygen species" - chemically reactive molecules containing oxygen, such as peroxides, commonly referred to as free radicals - are necessary for the proper healing of skin wounds in the laboratory roundworm C. elegans.

In a paper published in the October 13 issue of the journal Developmental Cell, the researchers found that free radicals generated in the mitochondria not only are necessary for skin wound healing, but that increased levels of reactive oxygen species, or ROS, can actually make wounds heal faster.
Magnify

Tend to your inner garden - Why your gut flora may be making you sick

Over the last 100 years, with the industrialization of our food supply, our diet has changed dramatically. This highly processed, high-sugar, high-fat, low-fiber diet has substantially altered our gut bacteria, contributing to the epidemic I call diabesity.

The food we eat not only feeds our fat cells, but also determines what kind of inner garden we are growing in our guts. This garden is filled with bugs that determine more about your health and your emotional and mental wellbeing than you ever imagined! Getting your gut bacteria healthy is one of the most important things you can do to get and stay healthy. If your bacteria are sick, so are you!

Your gut wall houses 70 percent of the cells that make up your immune system. You might not attribute digestive problems with allergies, arthritis, autoimmune diseases (irritable bowel syndrome, acne, chronic fatigue), mood disorders, autism, dementia, and cancer. Many diseases seemingly unrelated are actually caused by gut problems.

If you want to fix your health, start with your gut. Gut health literally affects your entire body.

Consider the important jobs your gut performs regularly, including breaking down food, absorbing nutrients, keeping out toxins, and producing nutrients. That's a lot of work! For optimal immunity, detoxification, and nourishment, your gut must function seamlessly.

Comment: Learn more about the fascinating world of the microbiome:

Evil Rays

BioSurveillance: Tracking your Preschooler's health

© activist post
University of Michigan research shows web-based system could help improve detection and response to spread of illnesses.

There is growing trend toward the use of "biosurveillance" - Web-based systems to track public health, many times with an added predictive model . As you'll see in the University of Michigan press release below, a familiar sales pitch is employed to assert that the only way to keep the public safe is through pervasive surveillance ... now including preschoolers.

With Ebola taking center stage as the latest threat to humanity, along with new concerns over enterovirus EV-D68 which is afflicting children in increasing numbers, the surveillance state is not letting a single crisis go to waste.

Recent announcements by social media companies also indicate the arrival of full-scale health surveillance. Twitter's "ChatterGrabber" is a "machine-learning algorithm" that will harvest communications for "tickborne diseases, such as Lyme disease, public sentiment involving vaccines ...serving as an early warning system for public health officials through suspicious tweets or conversations." And Facebook is
" exploring creating online 'support communities' that would connect Facebook users suffering from various ailments...also considering new 'preventative care' applications that would help people improve their lifestyles."

Comment: The statement by Hashikawa: 'Preliminary data suggest that using the online biosurveillance in child care centers and preschools gives us an earlier detection and warning system because the younger children appeared to become sick first compared to middle school and high school aged children within the community.'

One cannot help but wonder if there is a larger agenda to such bio-surveillance, the author of the article pointed out this possibility in the following quote: 'Embedded in all of these missions, naturally, is a drive to ensure a wider adoption of vaccines, perhaps making them mandatory under medical martial law.' Think the author is reaching or his statement is too far fetched? Not really when you consider the following article:

UNICEF Surveils, Defames health sites over vaccines

A stunning new report reveals that the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) has been monitoring independent health sites and their users in an attempt to identify 'anti-vaccine influencers' and their effect on lackluster vaccine uptake.

The report also makes the following recommendations:
"International agencies and other partners will need to combine forces and support governments to reverse this counterproductive trend and develop common strategies to promote immunization, as one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions known in the world." [emphasis added]


Heart

Living near major roads may increase risk of sudden cardiac death in women

© American Heart Association
Highway near apartments.
Living close to a major road may increase women's risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

"It's important for healthcare providers to recognize that environmental exposures may be under-appreciated risk factors for diseases such as sudden cardiac death and fatal coronary heart disease," said Jaime E. Hart, Sc.D., study lead author and an instructor in medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. "On a population level, living near a major roadway was as important a risk factor as smoking, diet or obesity."

While researchers previously found a modest increase in coronary heart disease risk among people who live near major roadways, the new study may be the first to examine the impact of roadway proximity to the risk of sudden cardiac death. Researchers note that roadway proximity could be a marker for exposure to air pollution.
Syringe

Russian scientists have created three Ebola vaccines according to Health Ministry

Russian scientists
© Reuters / Thomas Peter
Russian scientists are working on three potential Ebola vaccines which they expect to introduce as soon as in the next six months. "One of the vaccines is "already ready for clinical trials," Russia's health minister Veronika Skvortsova has announced. "We have created three vaccines," Skvortsova announced in an interview with Rossiya-1 TV. "One vaccine is based on a strain of Ebola, and the other two have been created by means of genetic engineering."

Russian virologists have also created an anti-virus drug that, they believe, could be successfully used for treating Ebola as tests have showed that that it is effective in curing Ebola-related diseases.

So far, there is now no licensed treatment or vaccine for the highly contagious disease that has killed over 4,000 people in western Africa since the start of the year and has recently started spreading beyond the region.

Now several countries are trying to develop an effective treatment. The first-ever human trials for an Ebola vaccine started in Mali earlier this week. On October 8, the first health worker received the drug. Over the course of the trial, which is being organized by the University of Maryland and Mali's Health Ministry, a total of 40 volunteers will be given the vaccine.

In Russia it's impossible to contract the Ebola virus, Skvortsova said, adding that the country has still implemented a protection plan against the virus, which it stepped up in July.

"We are now carrying out a sanitary inspection of 7,500 flights per month, which is almost half a million people," she said. "Everybody coming from West Africa is under special control, especially 450 students who study in Russian universities. Sixteen of them had viral illnesses and were hospitalized, but they were not relevant to the [virus]."

Skvortsova said that 71 of Russia's airports have upgraded their security and now have thermal cameras to detect the first signs of the virus. "Both portable and stationary thermal scanners are being used at many airports, and we are monitoring all direct and indirect flights that arrive," she said.

Comment: Russia's Vector State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology based in Koltsovo, in the Novosibirsk region, developed Reaferon-Lipint several years ago. This vaccine proved effective in dealing with Ebola virus during laboratory tests. Also in the running for an Ebola cure are Canada, Japan and the U.S. WHO does not expect a reliable vaccine to be developed before 2015 and an estimated 30,000 doses will be required to curb the epidemic at its current level.

See the following to trace the epidemic:
Ebola: Evolution of an epidemic (INTERACTIVE MAP)

Health

Dallas health worker who tested positive for Ebola wore 'full' protective gear

A Texas health worker who provided care for the first
person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S. has tested positive for the deadly virus in a preliminary examination. (Reuters)

In the first apparent case of Ebola transmission in the United States, a Texas hospital worker who treated an Ebola-stricken Liberian man has tested positive for the deadly virus.

The preliminary test result was announced early Sunday, four days after the death of Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan in Dallas.

The Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital worker reported "a low-grade fever" Friday, the Texas Department of State Health Services said in a statement. This person "was isolated and referred for testing." The preliminary test result was received late Saturday.

Comment: Scientists stumble across the obvious treatment for Ebola: tobacco

Vitamin C - A cure for Ebola

Heart

Impact of mental stress on heart varies between men, women

Study looks at mental and physical stress on patients with stable heart disease

Graphic
© Zainab Samad, et al.
This graphic shows the effects of mental stress on psychophysiological domains, myocardial ischemia, and outcomes in men and women.
Men and women have different cardiovascular and psychological reactions to mental stress, according to a study of men and women who were already being treated for heart disease. The study, published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, looked at 56 women and 254 men diagnosed with heart disease enrolled in a larger REMIT study of the impact of the medication escitalopram on heart disease induced by mental stress.

After undergoing baseline testing, participants carried out three mentally stressful tasks - a mental arithmetic test, a mirror tracing test, and an anger recall test - followed by a treadmill exercise test. During mental stress tasks and rest periods between tests, researchers conducted echocardiography to study changes in the heart, took blood samples, and measured blood pressure and heart rate.

Researchers from the Duke Heart Center found that while men had more changes in blood pressure and heart rate in response to the mental stress, more women experienced myocardial ischemia, decreased blood flow to the heart. Women also experienced increased platelet aggregation, which is the start of the formation of blood clots, more than men. The women compared with men also expressed a greater increase in negative emotions and a greater decrease in positive emotions during the mental stress tests.
Magic Wand

Nature's pain killers

Are you in pain? You don't have to reach for over-the -counter pain killers, or even the heavy pharmaceutical hitters prescribed by your doctor; there are literally hundreds of natural pain killers waiting for you in the abundance of nature. You can count on plants and herbs to alleviate everything from arthritis pain, to headaches, to burns - read on to find out more.

Many pharmaceutical pain medications, while effective and useful at times, can be downright dangerous, but there is another solution to your pain problem. "Almost always, if we find pharmaceuticals doing the trick, we'll find a plant doing the same trick - and doing it more safely," remarks botanist James A. Duke, PhD, author of The Green Pharmacy Guide to Healing Foods.
Info

Leading Neuroscientist: "ADHD is not a real disease"

One of the world's leading pediatric neuroscientists, Dr. Bruce D. Perry, M.D., Ph.D, recently stated publicly that Attention Deficit/Hyper-Activity Disorder (ADHD) is not 'a real disease,' and warned of the dangers of giving psycho-stimulant medications to children.

Speaking to the Observer, Dr. Perry noted that the disorder known as ADHD should be considered a description of a wide range of symptoms that many children and adults exhibit, most of which are factors that everyone of us displays at some point during our lives.
"It is best thought of as a description. If you look at how you end up with that label, it is remarkable because any one of us at any given time would fit at least a couple of those criteria," he said.

Comment: There is a connection between diet and hyperactivity in children. Read the following articles for more information about how ADHD symptoms can be reduced by a change in diet:
According to a new study by Dutch scientists, restricting the range of foods fed to children suffering from ADHD can "significantly improve" their disrupting behavior and can prove a standard treatment for such kids.
A new study from Perth's Telethon Institute for Child Health Research shows an association between ADHD and a 'Western-style' diet in adolescents.

Leader of Nutrition studies at the Institute, Associate Professor Wendy Oddy, said the study examined the dietary patterns of 1800 adolescents from the long-term Raine Study and classified diets into 'Healthy' or 'Western' patterns.

Dr Oddy said:
"We suggest that a Western dietary pattern may indicate the adolescent has a less optimal fatty acid profile, whereas a diet higher in omega-3 fatty acids is thought to hold benefits for mental health and optimal brain function.

"It also may be that the Western dietary pattern doesn't provide enough essential micronutrients that are needed for brain function, particularly attention and concentration, or that a Western diet might contain more colors, flavors and additives that have been linked to an increase in ADHD symptoms.


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