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Pirates

Vatican Radio: UNICEF and WHO are sterilizing girls through vaccines

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© patheos.com
Kenya Catholic Bishops
Vatican Radio last week charged that United Nations organizations promoting population control are using vaccines to surreptitiously sterilize women in Third World countries. Kenya's Ministry of Health, along with the UN organizations — World Health Organization (WHO) and UNICEF — deny the charges, which carry the full weight of the Vatican. Vatican Radio is the official "voice of the Pope and the Church in dialogue with the World."

"Catholic Bishops in Kenya have been opposed to the nationwide Tetanus Vaccination Campaign targeting 2.3 million Kenyan women and girls of reproductive age between 15-49 years, terming the campaign a secret government plan to sterilize women and control population growth," reported Vatican Radio, as it took the occasion of the ordination of a Kenyan Bishop, Joseph Obanyi Sagwe, as an opportunity to remind the world of its concern.

Comment: Additional articles about the disturbing 'vaccine program' carried out by the WHO and UNICEF in Kenya:


Sun

10 shocking facts about sunscreen

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After reading study after study reporting the alarming increase in skin cancer cases over the last several years, I've started to wonder what sunscreen might have to do with it. I recently came across the research of Dr. Elizabeth Plourde, the author of Sunscreens Biohazard - Treat as Hazardous Waste. Dr. Plourde is a hormone specialist with 25 years of extensive medical research and writing to her credit who has recently focused her attention on the hormonally disruptive chemicals utilized in sunscreens. I had the opportunity to speak with her a few days ago and here are the most disturbing conclusions of her research:

Comment: Additional shocking facts about sunscreen:


Holly

Researchers find that walking in a forest optimizes natural immunity

Anyone who has walked in a forest knows by common sense the beauty of it. It's why some people choose to live in forests, or next to them, and why other people travel thousands of miles to stand in Redwood forests, or the rain forests of Costa Rica or Ecuador. But researchers in Japan, where the tradition called shinri-yoku, or "forest bathing" is still strong, have discovered some biochemical reasons why. Researchers found that forest bathing optimizes natural immunity, which is important to prevent cancer as well as other chronic illnesses. How does that happen?

Comment: The study also showed that 'forest bathing' reduced hostility and depression as well as increasing people's liveliness. Fore more information on the benefits of spending time in nature, see:


Bacon

Don't throw out that fat -- put it to good use

© leitesculinaria.com
If you're a hunter, a prepper, a homesteader, a chef or a crafter, you probably know at least a few uses for animal fats.

If you're prepping, knowing which fats are best for certain projects will give you even more tools to work with when you may need them.

Different animals yield different fat with different textures, melting points and flavors, and thus different uses. Also, some animals carry much more fat than others, so if you're hunting during a time that you need a lot of fat, you may be able to target higher-fat animals versus their slimmer counterparts.

Today we're going to touch on a few different projects and match you up with animals that provide good fat for your needs.

Megaphone

Small newspaper reports about vaccine-damaged children receiving financial compensation from the federal vaccine court

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The corporate media won't report such cases because their bottom line is more important than being honest with their readers, but vaccine damages do occur, even if the big newspapers don't want to risk their pharmaceutical industry ad purchases to tell you about them.

But not all media is corrupted in that manner, so our hats go off to the small-time Charlotte Observer, of Charlotte, North Carolina, which had the courage to tell the story of a local resident whose child has no future, thanks to vaccines.

As the paper reported in its February 28 edition online:

As they started their family, Mooresville residents Theresa and Lucas Black dutifully got their children immunized, never doubting their doctor's word that vaccines are safe and necessary.

But their faith in those promises was shaken in 2001, when their 3-month-old daughter, Angelica, developed life-threatening seizures and brain damage just three days after getting several vaccinations.

A neurologist in Charlotte diagnosed Angelica with vaccine-related encephalopathy - a brain injury. And in 2006, she was awarded $2 million plus $250,000 from a little known federal judiciary called the "vaccine court," which was established just for this purpose: Paying out vaccine-related injury claims.

Bullseye

Spokane City Council member threatened with job loss for refuting mandatory vaccines

© KREM
Spokane Councilman Mike Fagan.
A member of the Spokane, Washington, City Council says he was threatened with removal from a health panel if he espoused anything other than the consensus view that vaccines for children should be mandatory.

In an interview with local CBS affiliate KREM, Councilman Mike Fagan says other council members called on him to resign from the Board of Health following comments he made about vaccines.

His vaccine crime was stating that he did not believe that the "science of vaccinations is not settled yet" regarding vaccines, according to a separate report by Health Impact News.

Comment: If you want a vision of the future, imagine a needle shoved into a human arm - forever.


Coffee

People reach peak of mental powers at various ages for different skills

© unknown
Brains work quicker at 18, but some mental powers peak surprisingly late.

People reach the peak of their mental powers at different ages for different skills, according to a new study.

People think fastest at around 18-years-old, but the ability to read the emotions of others does not peak until between 40 and 60, the study found.

Vocabulary skills, meanwhile, do not peak until people are in their 60s or 70s.

In fact there may be no time in life at which all the mental powers are peaking, although some bunch together in youth.

Comment: Each new study seems to point to the fact that our brains are far more complex and that brain capacity does not necessarily decline with age. In fact many studies have shown that keeping the brain active and being on a ketogenic diet may enable us to maintain our abilities well into old age.

A 2009 study, found that people who keep their brains active saw a 30 to 50 percent decrease in risk of developing memory loss. A high-fat, low-carb diet such as the ketogenic diet provides the brain with a much more efficient fuel source and provides a better environment for neuronal recovery and repair.


Dreamsicle

What diet soda does to belly fat

More evidence that diet soda contributes to weight gain, not weight loss

A new study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that people who drank diet soda gained almost triple the abdominal fat over nine years as those who didn't drink diet soda. The study analyzed data from 749 people ages 65 and older who were asked, every couple of years, how many cans of soda they drank a day, and how many of those sodas were diet or regular.

Those answers ended up being extremely predictive of abdominal-fat gain, even after the researchers adjusted for factors like diabetes, smoking and levels of physical activity. People who didn't drink diet soda gained about 0.8 in. around their waists over the study period, but people who drank diet soda daily gained 3.2 in. Those who fell in the middle — occasional drinkers of diet soda — gained about 1.8 in.

Comment: See also:


Attention

WHO states Monsanto's Roundup 'probably' causes cancer

For over 40 years Monsanto's patented glyphosate formula, better known as Roundup, has become a staple for farmers, gardeners, and landscapers. Monsanto has gone so far as to create genetically modified crops capable of withstanding massive amounts of the pesticide without dying. These "Roundup Ready" crops, such as corn, soy, and canola, have since come to dominate America's agricultural industry.

But over the years, many researchers have questioned whether these heavily sprayed crops are safe for human consumption. As time goes on, it appears that some institutions are beginning to change their tune on the popular pesticide.
(Reuters) - The world's most widely-used weed killer can "probably" cause cancer, the World Health Organization said on Friday.

The WHO's cancer arm, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), said glyphosate, the active ingredient in the Monsanto Co herbicide Roundup, was "classified as probably carcinogenic to humans"

Comment: The WHO is a little late in the game on this one. The toxic effects of glyphosate has been well-documented.


Bulb

Power naps do work: Increase memory retention

A team of researchers at Saarland University headed by Professor Axel Mecklinger have shown that a short nap lasting about an hour can significantly improve memory performance. The study, which was coordinated by graduate research student Sara Studte, involved examination of memory recall in 41 participants. The volunteers had to learn single words and word pairs. Once the learning phase was over, the participants were tested to determine how much information they could remember. About half of the participants were then allowed to sleep, while the others watched a DVD. After that, the participants were re-tested and those who had taken a nap were shown to have retained substantially more word pairs in memory than the participants in the control group who had watched a DVD.

The results of the study have been published in the journal Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

Generations of school students have gone to bed the night before a maths exam or a vocabulary test with their algebra book or vocabulary notes tucked under their pillow in the hope that the knowledge would somehow be magically transferred into their brains while they slept. That they were not completely taken in by a superstitious belief has now been demonstrated by a team of neuropsychologists at Saarland University, who have shown that even a brief sleep can significantly improve retention of learned material in memory.