Earth Changes
Map


Binoculars

Wrong time, wrong place: Rare bird found in Barrie, Canada

© Darlene Deemert
An ash-throated flycatcher is shown in a Barrie backyard Nov. 18.
If you were a bird, you may want to consider flying south in October and not returning to our area until next May. Many human snowbirds do just that. Many birds migrate south to warmer climates for winter, then return in the spring, but some seed-eating birds tough out the winter with us.

There is a family of birds called flycatchers that survives by hawking flying insects out of the air in mid-flight. There are not many insects flying around in winter, so a flycatcher that tried to overwinter instead of migrate would have little chance of survival.

Flycatchers mainly eat insects and other invertebrates, but also fruit.

One of the largest and most common species of flycatcher that nests in our area in summer is the great-crested flycatcher. It is a member of the Myiarchus genus and the second-largest flycatcher in our area, slightly smaller than the eastern kingbird. Great-crested flycatchers leave our area in late summer and early fall to fly south to southern Central America or northern South America. There are few records of this species staying around in late fall or winter in our area.

Comment: Maybe some change in the planet's environment is interfering with this bird's ability to correctly utilise the Earth's magnetic field to navigate by? See also this: Animal Magnetism: How the magnetic field influences animal navigation

Extract -
Human impacts on the Earth's magnetic field

Humans have an impact on so many aspects of the earth's ecology. While wrangling with the magnetic field might seem like an activity that is out of our reach, human-induced electromagnetic noise could be a concern for migrating animals.

In a 2014 study published in the journal Nature, laboratory studies on robins showed birds that were exposed to background electromagnetic noise had trouble discerning which way was south.


While other studies have not seen the same impact from everyday background noise, it's prudent to be aware that human-induced electromagnetic disturbances could have an impact on some animals' highly-tuned sensory systems.
Then again, perhaps any magnetic changes of a natural kind may also play a role? Earth's magnetic field is weakening 10 times faster now

Binoculars

Rare bird from Mongolia turns up in Wakefield, UK

© Mick Hemingway
Blyth's Pipit
A rare bird caused twitchers to flock to Wakefield today (Monday).

A Blyth's Pipit was spotted late morning by birder Jonathan Holliday close to the Calder Wetlands site, which is across from Pugneys Country Park.

The bird, which breeds in Mongolia, is believed to be the first county record for Yorkshire.

Birders from across the region rushed to Denby Dale Road to see the "archetypal little brown job" after the news broke on social media and pagers. More twitchers are expected tomorrow.

Comment: Maybe some change in the planet's environment is interfering with this bird's ability to correctly utilise the Earth's magnetic field to navigate by? See also this: Animal Magnetism: How the magnetic field influences animal navigation

Extract -
Human impacts on the Earth's magnetic field

Humans have an impact on so many aspects of the earth's ecology. While wrangling with the magnetic field might seem like an activity that is out of our reach, human-induced electromagnetic noise could be a concern for migrating animals.

In a 2014 study published in the journal Nature, laboratory studies on robins showed birds that were exposed to background electromagnetic noise had trouble discerning which way was south.


While other studies have not seen the same impact from everyday background noise, it's prudent to be aware that human-induced electromagnetic disturbances could have an impact on some animals' highly-tuned sensory systems.
Then again, perhaps any magnetic changes of a natural kind may also play a role? Earth's magnetic field is weakening 10 times faster now

Cloud Lightning

Typhoon Hagupit destroys 2500 homes, death toll rises to 27

typhoon hagupit
The death toll from Typhoon Hagupit, the latest natural disaster to hit the Philippines, has risen to 27; around 2,500 homes have been totally or partially destroyed by the storm, which is losing its destructive force and weakening into a tropical storm.

According to Reuters, 27 people have been killed and around 2,500 homes have been totally or partially destroyed by Typhoon Hagupit in the Philippines.

"We now have a total of 27 dead, most of them in Borongan, in Eastern Samar," the news agency quotes Richard Gordon, chairman of the Philippine Red Cross as saying, adding that most of the dead drowned in floodwaters.

Comment: The Philippines seems to be in the cross-hairs lately as this is the third tropical storm in the past few months:

Tropical storm Fung-wong hits the Philippines, Taiwan with torrential rainfall, flooding - 13 dead

Tropical storm Rammasun threatens Philippines; intensifying to typhoon by mid-week

Bizarro Earth

Magnitude-6.6 tremor is second large quake to rock Panama in 3 Days

Panama Quake_081214
© USGS
A magnitude-6.6 earthquake struck off the coast of Panama on Monday, the second strong quake to rock the country in three days. The tremor was centered 20 kilometers (12 miles) south-southeast of the Punta de Burica peninsula, near the border with Costa Rica, and hit just before 4:00 a.m. local time, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

Despite the earthquake's magnitude and widespread shaking, the director of Panama's National Civil Defense Service, José Donderis, indicated via Twitter that there were no reports of damage. The epicenter of the quake, which occurred at a depth of 20 kilometers, was about 58 kilometers south-southwest of the city of David, Panama's third-largest city with a population of about 145,000 people. Any aftershocks are expected to be less intense, however, they could be strong enough to cause damage to infrastructure possibly weakened by the main earthquake.
Attention

Six sperm whales found dead in rare mass beaching in South Australia

© aptn

A pod of six sperm whales washed up dead Monday in a rare mass stranding on the South Australia coast, with animal welfare officials struggling over the logistics of handling the huge carcasses.

The whales, which can weigh up to 50 tonnes, were found at low tide by residents on Parara beach, about 93 miles northwest of Adelaide.

"We're not sure why they beached," a Department of Environment official told AFP.

"A theory is that one was ill and moved to shallow waters and then called out to fellow pod members who followed it in."

A local fisherman suggested they could have been chasing a school of salmon.


Comment: There have now been 14 reports of dead whales emanating from Australasia over the last 3 months, see also -

3 stranded sperm whales die on Rototai beach, New Zealand

12th report in 2 months of dead cetaceans Down Under: Carcass of humpback whale found drifting off Perth coast, Australia

Humpback whale carcass found on Gold Coast beach, Australia

36 stranded pilot whales die in New Zealand

Rare beaked whale found dead on Sunshine Coast, Queensland

Rare, record-sized pygmy whale found dead on Victorian beach, Australia

Eight-metre dead whale washes onto rocks in Batemans Bay, Australia

Dead humpback whale found on Kapiti Coast, New Zealand

Rare deep sea dwelling beaked whale washes up on beach near Newcastle, Australia

Denizen of deep water, cuviers beaked whale found dead on Titahi Bay beach, New Zealand

Humpback whale washes up dead at Kalbarri beach, Western Australia

Dead fin whale found on beach in Warrnambool, Australia

Two dead humpback whales wash up on NSW beaches, Australia

Creatures from the deep signal major Earth Changes: Is anyone paying attention?

Question

Mako shark washes up dead on Barmouth beach, Wales

The huge Mako-type mackerel shark was found on Barmouth beach, western Wales, on Saturday afternoon, 6817 miles away from its natural habitat

A massive shark has washed up on a Welsh beach - 7000 miles away from its natural habitat.

The huge Mako-type mackerel shark was found on Barmouth beach, western Wales, on Saturday afternoon.

Normally the fish are found in the Atlantic Ocean off the Argentinian coast, a whopping 6817 miles away from Wales.

Photographer Gwion Liggett, from Barmouth, Gwynedd, captured the amazing scene just a few hours after the shark was found.

Ice Cube

SOTT Earth Changes Video Summary - November 2014

© SOTT.net
It's one thing to have record early cold temperatures and record early snowfalls in both Eurasia and North America. To have the greatest ever snow coverage for the Northern Hemisphere by mid-November is something else. November 2014 was alternately mild and super-freezing as the Polar Jet Stream whip-lashed the North American continent, bringing monster snowstorms that dumped entire annual snowfall averages in many parts of the U.S., not least the city of Buffalo, New York, which was buried under 7 feet (2.25 meters) of snow.

Numerous bright meteor fireballs were caught on camera, including several big ones - probably comet/asteroid fragments - that were seen from huge swathes of the US, Russia, China, Japan and Europe. Buenos Aires was flooded for the second time this year, while record-breaking (in many cases, breaking records set last month) rainfall levels were seen across much of the western Mediterranean, killing many people in Morocco, southeastern France and northwestern Italy.

Sinkholes from China to Florida opened up to swallow people and cars. Brisbane, Australia was literally smashed by baseball-sized hail in a surprise 'super-storm'. The Great Lakes began to refreeze by mid-November, not 4 months after finally thawing from last winter. Japan's largest active volcano erupted, as did Colima Volcano in Mexico, and Pavlof in Alaska, each sending ash plumes several kilometers high, while lava flows from Hawaii's Kilauea and Cape Verde's Fire Island destroyed homes.

Then there were UFOs over Paris and Iran, pods of deepwater whales seeking shallow waters, and tornado outreaks in the Mediterranean... has the world gone mad? These were the 'Signs of the Times' in November 2014:

Attention

Wild boar creates havoc at Yonsei University, South Korea

© Yonhap
The boar broke through the glass door of the entrance and proceeded to damage the elevator doors ahead of it.
A wild boar broke into a Yonsei University Wonju campus building on Dec. 4. at approximately 7:28 p.m., according to Yonhap.

Wonju is the most populous city in the Gangwon province just 87 miles east of Seoul.

After creating havoc and noise on the first floor of the building, the boar escaped.

"There was a very large boar that broke through the entrance. It proceeded to damage the elevator doors and even got trapped," said a man named Shim. "My coworkers I were on our way out and it frightened us."

Police and firefighters were called to the scene, but by that point all that was left were broken doors, glass and blood from the boar's injuries.

The building is a student dormitory as well as a business incubator. It is surrounded by hills and natural areas.

Comment: See also: More odd animal behaviour: Wild boar smashes into German hardware store

TV cameraman viciously attacked by a wild boar on Japanese street

Wild boar shot after midnight attack on family, China

150 kg wild boar attacks sanitation workers and rams into police car in China

Wild boar runs amok in Russian city attacking people and cars

Snowflake

Northern Hemisphere snow cover this fall the most extensive ever recorded

© Rutgers Global Snow Lab
Fall snow cover extent in the Northern Hemisphere, 1967 to 2014
Data from Rutgers University Global Snow Lab show that Northern Hemisphere snow cover extent exceeded 22 million square kilometers this fall (September, October, and November) exceeding the previous greatest fall extent recorded in 1976.

During November alone, North America had its most extensive snow cover on record, the Lower 48 had its most extensive snow cover on record, and Canada had its second most extensive snow cover on record,

Not unexpectedly, The Washington Post goes to great lengths to explain why snow cover can increase in a warming world.

Thanks to Jason Cragg for this link
Roses

Toddler dies after attack by family dogs in Citrus County, Florida

Deputies responded to the death of a 2-year-old toddler Saturday afternoon from an apparent dog attack, the Citrus County Sheriff's Office said.

The family had three children, four Rottweilers and another small dog. Animal control officers removed all five dogs, said Heather Yates, Sheriff's Office spokeswoman.

Yates said the Department of Children and Families was notified, as is standard when a child dies and other children are in the home.

"The parents are distraught," Yates said.

No further information was immediately available.

Top