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Snakes in Suits

US company sells out of Ebola-themed toys

ebola toys

Promotional blurb on the website advertising the educational toys reads: 'Ebola has become the T. Rex of microbes. Share the love!'
An American company has sold out of Ebola-themed toys following a huge surge of interest in the deadly virus as it spreads across the globe.

Giant Microbes advertises three Ebola-themed toys, marketing them as "a uniquely contagious gift" that can help you learn "all about his fearsome front-page disease."

The Ebola virus has so far killed 4,555 people, with over 9,000 confirmed cases across seven different countries.

"Since its discovery in 1976, Ebola has become the T. Rex of microbes. Share the love!" reads the promotional blurb on the website.

Laura Sullivan, vice president of marketing at the company, said to the Toronto Star they had completely sold out worldwide.

"We get it in and sell out in a few days," she claimed, before reassuring potential customers the company were making more as "fast as we can" to keep up with demand.
Sheeple

CNN faces criticism after posting pic on Twitter mocking Ebola crisis

© John Griffin / CNN
A Twitter firestorm erupted after CNN tweeted a photo mocking the fear of Ebola while a congressional hearing took place on the crisis. It comes as 1,000 people are being monitored for symptoms in the US.

The photo was posted by John Griffin, a senior producer at CNN, and shows three New Day anchors - Chris Cuomo, Michaela Pereira, and Alisyn Camerota - pretending to be scared while two men in protective gear stand over them. The post has since been removed.

Social media users, particularly on Twitter, did not waste time reacting to the questionable post. For example, Addictinginfo.org slammed CNN for tweeting an image mocking the Ebola crisis.
Candle

Bolivian 'Day of Dignity' commemorates 'Black October' massacre

© teleSUR
Family members of victims of the 2003 repression
Residents of El Alto, protagonists of 2003 "Gas War," Demand Extradition of Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada from U.S.

Every year, thousands of Bolivians march in the month of October to remember the 2003 "Gas War," also known as the "Black October" massacre. Eleven years ago on October 17, 2003 Bolivian President Gonzalo "Goni" Sanchez de Lozada fled Bolivia on a commercial jet, leaving behind a trail of blood.

More than 60 people including men, women, and children were indiscriminately mowed down by the military's bullets under Sanchez de Lozada's command. Protests that began in the countryside quickly spread to the bustling city of El Alto, perched 4,100 meters above sea level overlooking Bolivia's administrative capital of La Paz, and the deadly response of the military was swift.

Demonstrators were opposed to a plan to export Bolivia's then privatized natural gas through neighboring Chile, perceived by many Bolivians to be a historical national enemy due to the loss of their coastline to British-backed Chile in the War of the Pacific.

The residents of El Alto risked life and limb in the streets demanding the nationalization of Bolivia's natural gas reserves so that all Bolivians would benefit from the country's natural resources rather than a small and privileged class of businessmen.

As the death toll mounted, Sanchez de Lozada's key supporters resigned one by one, and he narrowly escaped by helicopter to the airport of El Alto where he then flew to the eastern city of Santa Cruz before fleeing to the United States.

Comment: See: Bolivia nationalization further sidelines U.S.

Magnify

Mexico: New graves found in hunt for missing students

People searching for 43 missing Mexican students say they have found new burial pits.
protesters missing students
© www.ibtimes.com
Protesters hold photos of missing students outside the Attorney General's office.
The 43 have been missing since they clashed with police almost three weeks ago in the town of Iguala. Vigilantes who joined the search said they had found six new burial pits, at least two of which contained what they believe are human remains. The search had been stepped up after forensic tests showed bodies found on 4 October were not those of the students.

Gruesome find
The latest burial pits were found by members of a group of vigilantes who had travelled to Iguala to help with the search. They said they had found six pits, two of which looked freshly dug but had not been used yet.

They searched three of the remaining four and said they found what looked like human remains, clothes and hair in two of them. If confirmed, this would bring the total number of mass graves found around Iguala since the students' disappearance to 19.

Comment: The Mexican state of Guerrero is notorious for marijuana and opium traffic. The relentless drug wars have resulted in over 40,000 gang-related murders and thousands of missing persons. Numerous mass graves and hundreds of bodies riddle drug-run localities victimized by a combination of organized crime, corrupt local police and territorial drug gangs. There is speculation that the 43 students were turned over to a local drug gang by the police. In the scuffle, two students died and one was left in a vegetative state. The body of a third student was found later, his face skinned and his eye gouged out. Iguala's mayor and police chief, both suspected of working with the cartel, are on the run. There are eight more mass burial sites yet to be examined. Psychopathic Gangsters. Pure Evil. Not Muslims. To speculate who is keeping these cartels in business...just look northward.

Heart - Black

1.6 million UK pensioners living in poverty

Uk pensioner poverty 1
© Reuters
More than one and a half million British pensioners are "floundering" on low incomes and consigned to poverty, a report by elderly care charity Age UK suggests.

The research, How We Can End Pensioner Poverty, published on Friday, reveals that poverty among pensioners is rife in Britain, with 1.6 million living below the poverty line and a startling 900,000 living in "severe poverty."

While Age UK acknowledges the number of this category of British pensioner has fallen since 2000, the charity warns progress has stalled recently.

The charity's research reveals the single biggest cause of pensioner poverty in Britain is older peoples' failure to claim from the £5.5bn state benefit they are entitled to. These benefits would amount to an extra £1,700 per year, or £33 per week, for the claimants in question.
Light Sabers

Playing European countries against one another: NATO is to blame for Serbia-Albania brawl on a football pitch

Who would expect that a football match between Serbia and Albania would turn into a battle? Everyone! It's Serbia and Albania; it was bound to happen.

Not until US influence is excised from the Balkans can things ever settle down there, argues analyst Nikola Mirkovic.

Chalkboard

Frustrated parent with engineering degree lashes out at Common Core

© f_a_r_e_w_e_l_l/Flickr
There has been a lot of controversy surrounding the Common Core Standards, and one parent's rant quickly made the Internet rounds after he expressed frustration over his child's math assignments.

Earlier this year, Jeff Severt's son was given a math problem to solve using a number line and strategies, which is the new Common Core approach used in schools, KSDK reports. The assignment instructs kids to help a boy named Jack subtract 316 from 427.

The answer of 111 can be found in seconds using the old fashioned math, but the new way was difficult for the father to figure out.

According to The Blaze, Severt wrote a sarcastic response on the math problem.

"I have a bachelor of science degree in electronics engineering which included extensive study in differential equations and other higher math applications," he wrote. "Even I cannot explain the Common Core mathematics approach, nor get the answer correct. In the real world, simplification is valued over complication," he added, signing the letter as a "frustrated parent."

Comment: See also:

Red Flag

Confronting battered citizen syndrome

State-sponsored terrorism poses a significant challenge to the psychological well-being of the body politic. While evident in many geopolitical locales, this condition arising from such government abuses is especially prevalent in the West. Such a disorder is comparable to the psychological manipulation recognized on a micro-level in some spousal relationships.

Indeed, the 13-year-old "war on terror" has contributed to a grave societal malady that might be deemed "battered citizen syndrome." As the project of a transnational New World Order is laid out, the psychological constitution of the polity must necessarily experience perpetual crises and the threat thereof. Genuinely non-conventional political communication, organization and activism are among the few substantial means of combating battered citizen syndrome and the spiritual and psychological slavery it perpetuates.
Cheeseburger

This is what school lunch looks like in Chickasha, Oklahoma

Lunch
© EAGnews.org

This has to be a joke.

I don't think this is a joke.

Please, someone tell me this is a joke.

From EAGNews:
Eggs Fried

Starvation brings new nightmare to Ebola ravaged countries

© Independent
Sierra Leone's fields are without farmers. Its crops go un-reaped. In the quarantine areas, feeding is patchy - some get food, others don't. People then leave the enforced isolation in search of a meal, so Ebola spreads. In three West African countries where many already live a hand-to-mouth existence, the act of eating is increasingly rare.

Ebola, the virus that has ravaged Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea at an unprecedented rate, continues its devastating spread. The number of dead doubles with each passing month; the bodies unburied. More lives are devastated with each passing day.

And in the absence of a mass-produced vaccine, its treatment - enforced isolation, mass quarantines - now threatens to bring a new crisis: starvation.

Earlier this month, two children who were among the thousands orphaned by the virus, were visited by aid workers in Liberia's capital, Monrovia. At the time, the workers did not have the resources to take the children away. When they returned days later, the children were dead. They died not from Ebola, but starvation.

Yesterday, as the World Health Organisation warned that more than 4,500 people would be dead before the end of the week, a new threat to West Africa's stability emerged: three quarters of a million people may die from malnutrition, as an unprecedented modern famine follows the disease - if urgent action is not taken. While Ebola's direct consequences prompt terror, its indirect results are equally disturbing - food prices spiral, farms are abandoned, meals are scarce and those most in need, the estimated 4,000 orphans of the virus, go hungry.
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