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Fireball

Strange boom, flashes of light reported northwest of Toronto

Boom
© dealbreaker.com
Was it a blown hydro transformer, a meteor flying through the atmosphere? It couldn't have been a UFO, could it?

Whatever it was, few people seem to know, at least not yet.

Numerous reports from local residents seeing a flashing light and hearing a loud sonic boom began running rampant on Orangeville-centric social media sites on Wednesday night (May 28).

Residents in a radius as wide as Howard Crescent near the Headwaters Health Care Centre to College Avenue near Credit Meadows Elementary School reported hearing the unidentified noise at about 9:30 p.m.
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Was it a bird or a plane? No, a meteorite strikes Ohio man's car

Meteorite Strikes Car
© Dee Moorman
Massa describes the damage to his car after an impact around 2 a.m. Sunday.
Dayton - A Kettering man believes a meteorite hit his car early Sunday morning. Joe Massa said he was driving home in the center lane on I-75 North when his Buick was struck by something around 2 a.m.

Out of the corner of his eye, he said, "I could see something. It was a light, shadow, a beam of light, small. Within a split second, something hit me, the front of the car was pushed over into the far left lane."

Massa said there was a big flash when it hit.

"It was like a silent pop," Massa said, "then there was pressure in the car. I could feel pressure in my ears, like the air had changed in the car, in a split second."

Massa, who manages restaurants in the Cincinnati area, said he pulled over immediately to see if he hit a deer, a dog, or something else. He found nothing, except the damages to the right-front bumper.
Fireball

Fireball over Brasilia, Brasil - May 24 2014

And with the camera pointed to just 10 degrees above the horizon, hoping to capture some Meteor Camelopardalis stray, behold, caught a bolide in a unexpected elevation, fighting light pollution to display:
© Carlos Augusto Di Pietro‎- BRAMON - Brazilian Meteor Observation Network
Fireball 2

Meteor over Saitama, Japan - May 22 2014

© ts007
SonotaCo Meteor Forum with more photos and orbit calculation, etc link located here.
Comet

'First time' meteor shower may light up skies over North America this weekend

© Unknown
Will the May Camelopardalids light up the sky or will it get pulled out of Earth's proximity by Jupiter's gravity?

North America is in for a natural light show overhead, as a meteor shower expected over the weekend could turn into a full-on sky storm, affecting countries' entire skylines. Its intensity could even outdo the Perseid meteor shower.

Stargazers are expecting the spectacle to hit late Friday and last into Sunday morning, just as Earth passes through a stream of debris consisting of up to 1,000 pieces of a comet it shed in the 1800s falling all around, every hour, at speeds of 12 miles per second (19.3kps).

The so-called May Camelopardalids will peak at about 2am to 4am on Saturday, eastern US time, according to Bill Cooke of the Meteoroid Environmental Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. The name comes from the corner of the sky where we'll have to focus our gaze to see the shower's most prominent bits - the Giraffe constellation, right next to the North Star.
Telescope

A once-in-a-lifetime meteor shower may be on its way

May Camelopardalis
© Raoul Ranoa / Los Angeles Times
Skywatchers in North America may be in for a once-in-a-lifetime meteor shower this weekend if the May Camelopardalis light up the night sky early Saturday morning.

It's been 10 years since astronmer Peter Jenniskens predicted the event, which could produce as many as 200 meteors per hour. Or not.

As my colleage Deborah Netburn explained, the May Camelopardalis could happen as Earth moves into a debris field left by a small comet named 209P/LINEAR. But nothing is certain. The cloud of comet dust may turn out to be too small, or too sparse, to put on a show.
Fireball 5

1,000 years of Meteors in 30 seconds


The blue map follows their position in the sky using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). The main showers are highlighted with circles and listed by their International Astronomical Union name. A second radar map on the bottom looks at meteoroid speed.
* Maps produced using the space agency's Asgard program which tracks an estimated 4,000-5,000 meteoroids a day

* Every day, more than 40 tonnes of meteoroids hit our planet, with larger chunks of comet debris becoming fireballs

* The blue map tracks their position in the skies over our planet with the main showers highlighted in white circles

* A second radar map looks at meteoroid speed. The red regions indicate a speed of 7.5 miles/s (12km/s), the green from 26 miles/s (42km/s) and the blue from 41 miles/s (66km/s)

Every day, more than 40 tonnes of meteoroids hit our atmosphere.

Many are tiny specks of comet dust that crumble harmlessly in Earth's atmosphere, producing a slow drizzle of meteors in the night sky.

Bigger chunks of asteroid and comet debris create dozens of nightly fireballs around the planet - and now, these real-time maps mean you'll never have to miss one again.

Nasa's meteoroid visualisations are produced using the space agency's Asgard software program which tracks an estimated 4,000-5,000 meteoroids a day.

The blue map follows their position in the sky using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). The main showers are highlighted with circles and listed by their International Astronomical Union name.

Fireball

Meteor shoots across Tennessee sky

Tennesse meteor
© NASA
One of two meteors that lit up the Southern sky Thursday night burned up over Tennessee.

Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office, said the very bright meteor entered the atmosphere over Columbia, S.C. at 9.38 p.m. The basketball-sized meteor flew northwest at speeds reaching more than 78,000 miles-per-hour, eventually burning 52 miles above Pikeville, Tenn., just north of Chattanooga. In all, the meteor flew 290 miles, which Cooke said is quite rare.

The video below is from Cooke's blog and shows the meteor shooting across the sky.


Comment: This report of a meteor was about 45 min prior to a boom heard over West Virginia on the same night.

National Weather Service believes "boom" over West Virginia caused by meteor

Fireball 5

National Weather Service believes "boom" over West Virginia caused by meteor

© File photo
Charleston - We've received calls, emails, Facebook messages and tweets from many of you asking about a loud "boom" across our region. Many reports indicate that "boom" caused the land to quake.

We started getting reports of the boom around 10:30 p.m. Thursday.

We've spoken with 911 dispatchers in Lincoln, Logan and Boone Counties. Both said the National Weather Service said they believe a meteorite passed through the area, creating a sonic boom. 13 News has learned that many of you are reporting seeing a bright flash of light across the sky.

We've received calls from Logan, Boone and Raleigh counties and have even heard reports of the "boom" as far away as Kentucky. "We hear your reports," said Chief Meteorologist Spencer Adkins. Our newsroom is checking and we're also looking at things from a weather perspective."

No 911 centers we have reached out to report any emergency explosions of any kind.

New information shows people living in other states also experienced this phenomenon. For more, click here.

Comment: Worldwide fireball events going back a year.



Question

Flaming ball falls from sky in Australia and crashes 'like a bomb'

Flaming Object
© Audience submitted: Virginia Hills
Flaming object falling from the sky (bottom right of photo) seen looking east from Mount Isa about 6:30pm AEST.
Residents from across central and northern Queensland have reported seeing a huge flaming object fall from the sky.

They say what appeared to be a massive ball with a blue and orange tail hit the ground in the suburb of Kelso in Townsville around 6:30pm (AEST) last night.

Resident Kim Vega was sitting in her backyard at Kelso when she saw the moment of impact.

"It was like an explosion but without a sound," she said.

"You've just seen it was like an atomic bomb effect when it would have hit the ground and all the trees and the skies lit up."

Comment: When it comes to covering up for meteors entering the atmosphere, a falling satellite is always a good explanation. In this case, it might be, but the fact is that we live in a shooting gallery, though our scientists and governments use the media to sooth us that everything is under control, when it is not, and nobody is doing anything about it.

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