Science & Technology
Map


Butterfly

Hearing danger: Predator vibrations trigger plant chemical defenses

cabbage butterfly caterpillar
© Roger Meissen
This is a cabbage butterfly caterpillar feeding on an Arabidopsis plant where, on an adjacent leaf, a piece of reflective tape helps record vibrations.
As the cabbage butterfly caterpillar takes one crescent-shaped bite at a time from the edge of a leaf, it doesn't go unnoticed.

This tiny Arabidopsis mustard plant hears its predator loud and clear as chewing vibrations reverberate through leaves and stems, and it reacts with chemical defenses. Plants have long been known to detect sound, but why they have this ability has remained a mystery.

University of Missouri experiments mark the first time scientists have shown that a plant responds to an ecologically relevant sound in its environment.

"What is surprising and cool is that these plants only create defense responses to feeding vibrations and not to wind or other vibrations in the same frequency as the chewing caterpillar," said Heidi Appel, an investigator at MU's Bond Life Sciences Center and senior research scientist in the Division of Plant Sciences in the College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources.

Appel partnered with Rex Cocroft, an MU animal communication expert who studies how plant-feeding insects produce and detect vibrations traveling through their host plants.

"It is an ideal collaboration, that grew out of conversations between two people working in different fields that turned out to have an important area of overlap," said Cocroft, a professor of Biological Sciences in MU's College of Arts and Science. "At one point we began to wonder whether plants might be able to monitor the mechanical vibrations produced by their herbivores."
Black Magic

Frankensoldiers: GM blood cells to protect tomorrow's soldiers from bioweapons?

GM soldiers
© AFP Photo / Jim Watson
First Frankenfoods and now Frankensoldiers. Genetic warfare is on the horizon.
Blood transfusions containing genetically engineered cells could be the future of countering germ warfare, according to new research sponsored by DARPA, which hopes modified blood cells could help neutralize biological toxins deployed against soldiers.

In their research, scientists from the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research in Massachusetts were supported by the US Defence Research Projects Agency - renowned for being the scientific funding branch of the US military. The researchers involved said that the US was very interested in deploying the discovery against any biological weapons threats.

"We wanted to create high-value red cells that do more than simply carry oxygen," says Whitehead Founding Member Harvey Lodish, in a statement published on the Whitehead Institute website. Lodish collaborated with Whitehead Member Hidde Ploegh in the project.

Comment: This is without a doubt also part of the drive to create ethnic specific weapons.

See:Ethnic specific weapons: The real story behind the murder of Dr David Kelly

Fireball 4

'Unique' meteorite likely came from long-dead asteroid

Meteorite_1
© Discovery News
A well-known meteorite that was the first to be tracked by ground-based cameras as it blasted through the Earths atmosphere and quickly recovered at its Australian fall site has been identified as a geological oddity.

The Bunburra Rockhole meteorite was recovered from the Nullarbor Plain in Western Australia in 2007 and, after recent isotopic tests, its basaltic composition started a cosmic forensics investigation that has led researchers to believe it originated from an asteroid that no longer exists.

"This (meteorite) has a particular composition - which makes us think that it comes from a different body that has not been sampled before," said geochronologist and geochemist Fred Jourdan, associate professor at Curtin University, Perth. Jourdan and his team's work has been accepted for publication in the journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta.
Bizarro Earth

88% of world's oceans covered by plastic garbage - report

© AFP/Mike Clarke
Entrepreneur and conservationist who lives in Hong Kong, displays rubbish on a beach on the south side of Hong Kong which has been left uncleaned.
At least 88 percent of the surface of the world's open oceans is polluted by plastic debris, says a new scientific report. The findings raise large concerns of the safety of marine life and how this ocean litter may affect food chains.

"Those little pieces of plastic, known as microplastics, can last hundreds of years and were detected in 88 percent of the ocean surface sampled during the Malaspina Expedition 2010," lead researcher and the author of the study Andres Cozar from the University of Cadiz, told AFP.

The results of the study "Plastic debris in the open ocean" are based on 3,070 total ocean samples collected around the world by Spain's Malaspina science expedition in 2010. They have been recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), an official journal of the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

The total amount of plastic in the open-ocean surface is estimated at between 7,000 and 35,000 tons, according to the report. This amount, though big, is lower than the scientists expected.
Display

When computers can think for themselves how will we know it's happening?

artificial intelligence
© Christopher Brown/Flickr (slate sculpture of Alan Turing by Stephen Kettle
Headlines recently exploded with news that a computer program called Eugene Goostman had become the first to pass the Turing test, a method devised by computing pioneer Alan Turing to objectively prove a computer can think.

The program fooled 33% of 30 judges into thinking it was a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy in a five-minute conversation. How impressive is the result? In a very brief encounter, judges interacted with a program that could be forgiven for not knowing much or speaking very eloquently - in the grand scheme, it's a fairly low bar.

Chat programs like Eugene Goostman have existed since the 1970s. Though they have advanced over the years, none yet represents the revolutionary step in AI implied by the Turing test. So, if the Eugene Goostman program isn't exemplary of a radical leap forward, what would constitute such a leap, and how will we know when it happens?

To explore that question, it's worth looking at what the Turing test actually is and what it's meant to measure.

In a 1950 paper, "Computing Machinery and Intelligence," Alan Turing set out to discover how we might answer the question, "Can machines think?" Turing believed the answer would devolve into a semantic debate over the definitions of the words "machine" and "think." He suggested what he hoped was a more objective test to replace the question.
Laptop

US Intelligence agency trying to develop computers that think like humans

computer brain
© AFP Photo / Mauricio Lima
A little-known US intelligence research agency hopes to revolutionize the machine mind by finding firms capable of writing computer algorithms nearly identical to those implemented by the human brain.

The Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA), which operates under the Director of National Intelligence, will host a Proposers' Day conference for the Machine Intelligence from Cortical Networks (MICrONS) program on July 17, the agency said in a press release.

"The overall and specific goal of the MICrONS program is to create a new generation of machine learning algorithms derived from high-fidelity representations of cortical microcircuits to achieve human-like performance on complex information processing tasks," IARPA says.

In layman's terms, that means getting computers to operate and process information much like the human brain. For many information processing tasks, the brain employs algorithms - a step-by-step procedure for making calculations.
Info

The reeducation of GI cells to potentially treat, cure type 1 diabetes

GI Cells
© Columbia University Medical Center
Human gastrointestinal cells from patients were engineered to express insulin (fluorescent green) in the lab.
Type 1 diabetes is caused by the body's immune system attacking its own natural insulin-producing cells to the point where the body cannot properly regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have been pursuing therapies that could "re-train" the body's other cells to produce the proper amount of insulin necessary.

Now, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center have announced the ability to convert cells in the human gastrointestinal tract into insulin-producing cells by simply turning off a single gene, according to a new report in Nature Communications.

"People have been talking about turning one cell into another for a long time, but until now we hadn't gotten to the point of creating a fully functional insulin-producing cell by the manipulation of a single target," said study author Dr. Domenico Accili, a medical professor at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

The study team said their finding opens the door to the possibility of treating or curing type 1 diabetes through the reprogramming of existing cells, rather than through transplants or stem cells. Although insulin-producing tissue can be produced in the lab from stem cells, these cells do not yet possess all the capabilities of natural pancreatic beta cells.

Some scientists have instead tried to change present cells in a patient into insulin-producers. Prior research by Columbia scientists transformed mouse intestinal cells into insulin-producing cells; the new study indicates that this method also works in human intestinal cells. The team was able to instruct human gut cells to create insulin in reaction to physiologic conditions by turning off the cells' FOXO1 gene.
Telescope

Gliese 832c: A potentially habitable Super-Earth 16 light-years away?

Gliese 832 c
© PHL / UPR Arecibo
Artistic representation of the potentially habitable exoplanet Gliese 832 c as compared with Earth.
A team of astronomers led by Dr Robert Wittenmyer of the University of New South Wales has discovered a super-Earth orbiting near the inner edge of the habitable zone of Gliese 832 (GJ 832), a red-dwarf star previously known to host a cold Jupiter-like exoplanet.

Gliese 832, also known as HD 204961 or LHS 3685, is a M1.5 dwarf located in the constellation Grus, about 16 light-years from Earth. It has about half the mass and radius of the Sun.

This star is already known to harbor Gliese 832b, a cold Jupiter-like planet discovered in 2009.

"With an outer giant planet and an interior potentially rocky planet, this planetary system can be thought of as a miniature version of our Solar System," said Prof Chris Tinney, an astronomer with the University of New South Wales and a co-author of the discovery paper accepted for publication in the Astrophysical Journal (arXiv.org pre-print).
Books

Biosafety and the 'Seralini affair': Systemic corruption of science and regulation

© ejfood.blogspot.com
The forced retraction of a study that identified serious harm to rats fed on GMO maize and Monsanto's 'Roundup' reveals a deep and systemic corruption of science and regulation, writes Gilles-Eric Séralini. Urgent and far reaching reforms must now take place.

There is an ongoing debate on the potential health risks of the consumption of genetically modified (GM) plants containing high levels of pesticide residues.

Currently, no regulatory authority requests mandatory chronic animal feeding studies to be performed for edible GMOs and formulated pesticides. This fact is at the origin of most of the controversies. Only studies consisting of 90-day rat feeding trials have been conducted by manufacturers for GMOs.
Comet 2

New Comet: C/2014 L5 (Lemmon)

Discovery Date: June 9, 2014

Magnitude: 20.1 mag

Discoverer: R. A. Kowalski (Mt. Lemmon)

C/2014 L5 Lemmon
© Aerith Net
Magnitudes Graph
The orbital elements are published on M.P.E.C. 2014-M57.
Top