birth control
© Unknown
A proposed new law in Arizona would give employers the power to request that women being prescribed birth control pills provide proof that they're using it for non-sexual reasons.
Dude naw.

Some nutbag in Arizona - a woman, no less - authored a bill that would allow employers to interrogate their female employees about their sexual practices.

No seriously.

You might want to sit down for this one, actually.

Ready?

You see, if a female employee seeks a medical prescription for contraception, an employer will be permitted to ask that employee for proof that she doesn't plan to use the contraception for slutty f***-making. Using it for medical reasons is ok - that's medicine.

So, if you're one of those women who uses slutpills for non-slutty reasons, then you're ok. You'll get to keep your job. Enjoy your ovarian cancer or your acne or whatever, but make sure you put that red cover on your TPS reports or the boss'll have your head.

But if you're running around like some sort of whore-nympho, then you better keep that shit on the down-low, because if The Man finds out you might-could get fired:

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 6-2 Monday to endorse a controversial bill that would allow Arizona employers the right to deny health insurance coverage for contraceptives based on religious objections.

Arizona House Bill 2625, authored by Majority Whip Debbie Lesko, R-Glendale, would permit employers to ask their employees for proof of medical prescription if they seek contraceptives for non-reproductive purposes, such as hormone control or acne treatment.

"I believe we live in America. We don't live in the Soviet Union," Lesko said. "So, government should not be telling the organizations or mom and pop employers to do something against their moral beliefs."

Lesko said this bill responds to a contraceptive mandate in the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act signed into law March 2010.

"My whole legislation is about our First Amendment rights and freedom of religion," Lesko said. "All my bill does is that an employer can opt out of the mandate if they have any religious objections."

Glendale resident Liza Love said the bill would impose on women's rights to keep their medical records private.

Love spoke to the committee about her struggle with polycystic ovary syndrome and endometriosis, conditions requiring her to use birth control.

"I wouldn't mind showing my employer my medical records," Love said. "But there are 10 women behind me that would be ashamed to do so."
(read the rest)
This bill has no chance of becoming law***, but that's not the point, is it?

We're surrounded by f*****g lunatics and I want off this planet.

***As a BJ commenter pointed out, it's Arizona. It has a chance of becoming law. To clarify, I meant that the law has no chance of remaining law after the courts have their way with it. This shit isn't going to fly in the Ninth Circuit, in my opinion.

UPDATE: I'm so full of vagina outrage that I'm not being as clear as I should be. Arizona is an "at-will-employment" state, which means that employers do not need a reason to fire an employee. Theoretically, if an employer finds out that an employee wants to use birth control for preventing pregnancies, that employer would be within his or her legal right to fire the employee for being a nympho-whore (while couching it in other terms).